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December 2009 Archives

December 1, 2009

Pic of the Week - Framing

Focus on Disney World by Barrie Brewer

Using objects in the foreground of your shot to frame your subject is a good way to focus attention where you want it and add depth to your photo. This week we'll show you some examples of framing in our Pics of the Week. For a more in depth look at framing, check out this past blog entry.

World Showcase Framed
Copyright © 2009 Barrie Brewer, Nikon D300, 18-200VR lens, 1/500 sec, f/8

In this shot I used the tree canopy and bushes below to frame out Germany and Italy in Epcot's World Showcase. I got two for the price of one by framing Italy within the trunk of the tree.

December 2, 2009

American Idol Experience

Light Meter by Lisa K. Berton

This IS American Idol...Experience! (cue the music)

Whether you regularly watch the TV show and are excited to see a form of it at Disney's Hollywood Studios or you, a friend or relative is performing in the park, you're going to want photos. The first thing you need to know is that you cannot use a flash. The second thing you need to know is the stage looks brighter to the eye than it does to a camera lens.

The pictures I'm going to show you were all taken with a point and shoot camera, the Canon PowerShot 100SX IS. On this model, you have to manually raise the flash so there was no need for me turn off that function as most of you will need to do with your cameras. Also, I used a variety of settings which I will go over.

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Let's begin outdoors where we bob up and down, whistle, make faces, and twiddle our thumbs as we patiently wait for the doors to open. You can use the flash out here if you'd like but it'll bounce off the monitors. Look! It's last year's winner, David Cook! Everyone wave at him.

Random info: I refer to this as the Xanadu (one of my favorite movies & soundtracks) building as it was designed after the Pan-Pacific Auditorium where the movie was filmed and later burned down. :-(

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There are American Idol signs everywhere it seems. On the large screen at the rear of the stage, the logo rotates so you'll need a little patience and some good timing to get it lined up correctly. Keep in mind your point and shoot has a short delay. It took me 4 attempts using Auto mode to get it right. Why? Because Auto went with the following settings, ISO 640 which is good for low light, f8 good for distance shots and keeping things sharp, 1/20 good for a tripod or someone who can hold still and not breathe but not so good for things that rotate.

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If you're familiar with the television show then you will immediately recognize the three stools off to the left and how they are used. Hey, if you can't get tickets to the taping in California, soak it all in at Walt Disney World. Besides, you can't take photos of the real show.

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For this shot I used the Indoor Party mode. There's no movement here or people but who's to say the stools weren't chatting each other up and telling lame jokes.

One of the things that drives me crazy about sitting a few rows back is the probability of someone getting in my shot.

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Let's meet the judges. On the right is the Simon Cowellesque judge who is honest yet brash. In the center is the sweet and positive Paula Abdulish judge who you can actually understand. On the left is the dawg himself, the Randy Jacksony judge who is dope, yo.

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I used Indoor Party mode again here and it came up with ISO 800 which will allow the camera to shoot faster, f5.6 would be better if they were closer or the camera shot faster than the 1/30 it chose. Once more it took 4 shots to get something I liked. Granted I didn't need to line up anyone but people blink and change facial expressions.

Important note: Do you miss the clubs of Pleasure Island? That's Lisa from Comedy Warehouse in the center casting a spell on her pal.

Are you sitting towards the back? Does your camera have a short zoom or no zoom at all? Do you remember where I parked? Fear not photographers, there's always the larger-than-life screens on the side of the stage to photograph.

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Keep in mind that the screen doesn't budge but well, you know where I'm going with this. I don't need to tell you. The show has an MC to get everyone pumped up. This fella on the right was celebrating his anniversary. He was adorable.

Here it is, the big moment we've all been waiting for...the interview! See, furniture comes in handy. Camera crew members walk back and forth in front of the stage throughout the set. There's nothing you can do except wait for them to saunter out of the way, trip or use them in your shot. What the heck, it gives your photo that Hollywood edge.

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The downside to this fellow being right smack dab in front of me is that my camera focused on him and now the host and performer are out of focus.

Well, there you have it, all you need to know about getting those magical musical moments on film or a digital memory card. What? I forgot to go over the actual performances? Whoopsy.

The biggest thing to avoid is photographing someone when the microphone is in front of the mouth and blocking part of the face. Something a bit more advanced is to keep an eye on the lighting. Watch out for raccoon eyes, meaning that the eyes are in shadow and much darker than the rest of the face. Their lighting is designed to highlight singers from the back so more thna likely you should get this "glow" in every shot. If it were a glowing neon border then I'd really think I was in Xanadu.

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I switched to AV mode (Aperature Priority) and selected f5.6 and ISO 400. The camera chose 1/200 as the shutterspeed which worked out great.

Take advantage of spotlights and lighting in general when you can. It can take a nice image of someone singing and turn it into a rock concert shot and isn't that the whole idea behind American Idol.

You want to wait until they've moved the mic back or off to the side. Profile shots are also favorable for the same reasons.

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Michael Ruffin belts out Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody. Rock on!

December 3, 2009

Fez House Framed

Photographic Innoventions by Scott Thomas

Entrance to the Fez House in the Morocco pavilion in Epcot's World Showcase, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida

Entrance to the Fez House in the Morocco pavilion.
Nikon D70/18-200VR, 1/15s, f/3.5, ISO 900, EV +1.0, 18mm Focal Length

In Morocco's pavilion is the Fez House, which represents a typical Moroccan home. There are beautiful mosaic tiles, carvings, and artifacts from daily life. If you are quiet when you approach the fountain, you just might hear children playing in the distance. I used the entrance to frame the interior of the Fez House and is my Disney Pic of the Week on Framing. Morocco is full of framing opportunities as I showed a few weeks ago when Morocco was the Disney Pic of the Week.

December 4, 2009

Holiday Vacation!

Photographic Innoventions by Scott Thomas

Where in the world is Scott? He's vacationing in Walt Disney World this week and enjoying sights like Cinderella Castle in the holiday Dream Lights display. Ah, but he is not alone. Scott will be with over 50 other Disney fan photographers this weekend. He'll tell you all about it when he gets back.

Cinderella Castle all decked out in her holiday finest in the Magic Kingdom, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida.
Cinderella Castle all decked out in her holiday finest.
Nikon D70/70-200VR, 1/8s, f/3.5, ISO 400, EV +0.3, 18mm Focal Length

December 5, 2009

I See You!

Light Meter by Lisa K. Berton

While seated upstairs at Yak & Yeti in Disney's Animal Kingdom, I immediately noticed how my view of the area beyond the wall beside me was framed by a window. My Photography To Do List was with me and sure enough, what I saw fit one of our Disney Pic of the Week themes. With my Canon PowerShot SX100 IS I lined up this view by leaning back in my sit just a smidge and voila! No major effort needed, my work was done and without even getting up!

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December 6, 2009

Where in the World #113

Focus on Disney World by Barrie Brewer

This was Challenge #112:
 Where in the World #112

And here's the answer:
Cool Was in Epcot
Copyright © 2009 Barrie Brewer, Nikon D300, 18-200VR, 1/400s shutter, f/8

There were so many creative answers this week! I could just tell that you all knew where this was, even if you didn't quite know the exact name I was looking for - Cool Wash. Cool Wash is a cooling station near Test Track in Epcot, where you can get a little respite from the Florida heat. It looks like a car wash and sells Coke products. Many of you confused Cool Wash with Club Cool, which is on the other side of Future World in Innoventions West. It was such a common mistake that I included you folks in the drawing too.

This next week I'll be in Walt Disney World, taking lots of pictures and having fun with friends, so I'll be taking a short break from Where in the World. That means you have two weeks to answer Challenge #113. Come back on December 20 to see if you got it right.

Mike Malampy was the first to send in the correct answer for the challenge! Congratulations to Mike and all the other readers who got the answer right: Angie Young, Caroline Cupre, Jodi Cook, Pollyanna Buff, Emily Currier, Teri Jo Fuson, Louise Barton, Chloe, Deb Ragno, Marina And Wendy Crober, Sharon Dale, Jennifer Townsend, Amy Miller, Kris Nixon, Frank &Sharon Pierce, Michelle Raimist, Baines Family, Claressa Nisley, Scott Otis, Mckinley Yeaman, Brian Miller, Jen Bruno, Lee Anastasi, Cindy Dore', Erin Kubicki, Marc Acosta, Paula Munson, John Lacasse, Jeannette Shippee, Jessica Deans, Ben'jamin Dameron, Jason Skow, Jason Betit, K.l. Beasley, Kellie Harpel, Paul Cooper, Jen Cerce, Jeremy Hardy, Julie Wickware, Karen Nelson, Sue Thompson, Ed Aleszczyk, Tim Wingfield, Kristen Gainey, Michael Joel Gainey, Amanda Perkins, Z Cheven, Maureen Ohare, Linda Abbate, Mike Zendler, Christopher Bourassa, James Greene, Melesia Love, Wayne Witherspoon, Elizabeth Scarborough, Jerry Marceau, Jaclyn Kelch, Maryjean Kancel, Irene Kleintop, Carri Marotto, Brent Lollar, Erin Hammer, Misty Lyons, Dennis Blackburn, Jerry Felder, Tim Rachuba, Frank W, Aubrey Cooper, Kelly Kobiela, Walter N Clark, John Klein, Pasquale Crea, Jared Orth, J Breezy, Ken Fischler, Robin Mcconnell, Tim Johansen, Sabrina Bogart, John Leach, Thomas Auckland, Anthony Collins, Tom Koval, Kristin Dormuth, Bill Macbride, Nicole Cyr, Theresa Rucando, Wesley Brent Lollar, Jennifer Schwing, Heidi Goodhue, Barclay Bakkum, Anna Mansfield and Angela and David Blevins. Each of you will be entered in the December winners' drawing.
_______________________________________________________________________

Challenge #113: Where in the world is this?

 Where in the World #113

Do you know? Do you have a guess? Send in your answer, before the end of the day on Thursday, December 17, by clicking on the blue box below. Please do not post answers using the Feedback Form link at the bottom of this post. Remember to be specific with your answer - just naming a park will not get you into the drawing.

Click Here to Submit Your Answer
_______________________________________________________________________

Everyone who sends in a correct answer to a Where in the World Challenge this month will be entered in a drawing at the end of the month for some special AllEars® goodies and a cool Disney book!

December 7, 2009

February 2010 Walt Disney World Calendar

Focus on Disney World by Barrie Brewer

For this month's calendar, we're taking a trip to France - in Epcot that is. Be sure to scroll down to the bottom for a desktop wallpaper version of February's calendar.

You will need to have Adobe Reader on your computer to download the calendar(s). Just click on the photo to download the calendar you want.


This one prints out at 8.5" x 11". It's handy if you need a calendar that you can write on.

February 2010 8.5x11 Calendar


This one prints out at 4.75" x 4.75", the perfect size for a CD Jewel Case frame.

February 2010 Jewel Case Calendar

This month I was feeling inspired and created a wallpaper calendar that you can use on your desktop. Let me know if you'd like to have more of these.

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1024 x 768
1280 x 800
1280 x 1024
1440 x 900
1600 x 1200

December 8, 2009

Disney Pic of the Week: Rafiki's Planet Watch

Photographic Innoventions by Scott Thomas

When Disney's Animal Kingdom opened, Conservation Station was a unique area giving guests some behind the scenes access to how animals are cared for and to highlight ways Disney is helping and supporting world-wide conservation efforts. Now known as Rafiki's Planet Watch, the mission is still the same and you can often meet Rafiki, Pocahantas and Jiminy Cricket there.

Now known as Rafiki's Planet Watch, the old Conservation Station logo can still be seen outside the entrance in Disney's Animal Kingdom, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida
Now known as Rafiki's Planet Watch, the old Conservation Station logo can still be seen outside the entrance.
Nikon D70/18-200VR, 1/250s, f/8, ISO 200, EV +0, 18mm Focal Length

Come back on Thursday and Saturday to see Barrie and Lisa's views for our Disney Pic of the Week on Conservation Station.

December 9, 2009

Don't Flash the Bears

Light Meter by Lisa K. Berton

They're big 'n furry and they got themselves some musical instruments to entertain folks. Sit on down in the auditorium, get off yer feet, and enjoy Country Bear Jamboree. Clap yer hands and stomp yer feet but don't be taking any flash photos until the grand finale. Feel free to photograph Liverlips, Henry, Big Al, Trixie, Bunny, Beulah, Bubbles, Zed, Ted, Zeke, Tennessee, and Teddy Beara during the show without using the camera's flash.

Point and shoot cameras have various modes you may have tried such as Auto, Night Scene, and Party. Your camera may also offer you the ability to control settings manually. You can change the shutterspeed (how fast the camera takes the photo) and the f-stop or aperature (how much light is allowed through the lens). By opening up the f-stop (lower numbers let in more light, ie 2.8 is brighter than 5.6) you can shoot faster. It also helps if you increase the ISO which is the film speed.

For example...

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I used Manual and chose all of the settings. ISO 800, f3.5, and 1/60 I did this without zooming in and so they are small. Well, they only look small. These are bears we're talking about here.

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See now this time I used the optical zoom to fill the frame but kept all of the same settings. A high ISO for low light, f-stop that's as low is it can go, and a shutterspeed that's in the middle as far as capturing slow movement is concerned. My Canon PowerShot SX100 IS even caught Zeke winking at me, that flirty fella.

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Switching to Night Scene for the above and below shots, you should see several differences. The photos aren't as sharp becaue the camera slows down the shutterspeed to 1/13 and lowers the ISO all the way to 250. Another major difference is that a lower ISO of 250 is smoother than 800, this is most obvious in the background.

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Now you might be askin' yerselves, now what in tarnation is that camera thinkin'? I told it it's night time, it's dark out! That's correct and the camera is thinkin' that you are using a tripod or placing it on a flat surface and so it can use a slower shutterspeed to soak up all of the available light. With a lower ISO you'll have more vivid colors and less noise (digital film grain).

Another example...

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For this picture of Big Al, I set my camera to Auto and let it do all the thinking for me. You will most likely need to turn off your flash when using Auto. Simply press the button with a lightning bolt symbol and scroll over until you see the same icon inside a circle with a diagonal line through it.
no%20flash.gif

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Here I kept using the Auto mode however I pushed on the ISO button on my camera and selected High ISO.

Now here's the weird part. This shot was taken with ISO 800 and a shutterspeed of 1/25. The first picture of Big Al was taken with ISO 640 and a shutterspeed of 1/30. This is weird because the 2nd picture should have been the one taken with a faster shutterspeed. I'm pretty sure the stage lighting didn't change. It just goes to show you that when you use scene modes or Auto, there's always that chance the camera's going to select settings that you wouldn't choose manually.

A major benefit of digital photography is viewing your photo after you take it allowing you to change settings and try again.

December 10, 2009

Plastic is Pretty Awesome

Light Meter by Lisa K. Berton

I love animals. I love going to zoos, aquariums, and aviaries. Disney's Animal Kingdom isn't a zoo but there are animals including a petting zoo at Rafiki's Planet Watch. I was going to take the usual route and post an animal photo for you but I remembered I captured something else on my last visit. Something I hadn't seen there before and by the looks of it neither had these kids.

Allow me to introduce you (if you haven't already met) to Pipa, the wondrous walking talking recycling bin.

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December 11, 2009

Pixelmania!

Photographic Innoventions by Scott Thomas

What happens when you mix a love of Disney, a group of photography fanatics and a time to experience both? You get Pixelmania! The theme for Pixelmania was "A gathering of photography, friends & fun!" Hosted by The Magic In Pixels founder, Tim Devine, at Walt Disney World from December 3 to 6, 2009, Pixelmania was all that and more.

My Pixelmania experience started the night before it's official start. Six of us met up in Disney's Animal Kingdom to photograph during the evening Extra Magic Hours from 5 to 8pm. I had never photographed at Disney's Animal Kingdom at night so I was very excited about this opportunity. We decided to photograph the Tree of Life first. I did a few shots from across the river then one of the photographers decided to go over to one of the Tree of Life trails as he had an idea. I went with him and was so glad I did. The angle and composition he showed me made for a great photograph where I could include the waterfall and the brightly lit Tree of Life in the frame together.

Nighttime photo of a Tree of Life waterfall in Disney's Animal Kingdom, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida.
Nighttime photo of a Tree of Life waterfall.
Nikon D70/Tokina 11-16, 30s, f/11, ISO 200, EV +0.7, 11mm Focal Length, tripod

This is the same location I shared with you for the Tree of Life Pic of the Week earlier this year.

If it had not been windy I would have attempted a set of bracketed photos for creating a High Dynamic Range, or HDR, image. More on HDR next week.

This was the time I was going to shoot the full moon rising over Expedition Everest. That was not to be as the sky was heavily overcast. Not to be deterred, we all moved over to photograph the beautiful light Disney baths Everest in at night. One of the photographers mentioned doing a long exposure zoom effect shot and, I thought, why not?

Long exposure nighttime zoomed photo of Expedition Everest in Disney's Animal Kingdom, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida.
Long exposure nighttime zoomed photo of Expedition Everest.
Nikon D70/18-200VR, 20s, f/16, ISO 200, EV -0.3, Variable Focal Length, tripod

I think you are getting the idea here. With all of us photographing together, we bounced off ideas about techniques, compositions and equipment with each other. It was a fun and creative process which was repeated over and over during the four day Pixelmania! event.

The next morning, I hosted the first official event of Pixelmania! entitled, Panning 101, where I gave tips and demonstrated how to set up and do panning photography. Others chimed in with their tips and suggestions during the meet which was held on the path between Toontown and Tomorrowland in the Magic Kingdom. This location affords a good view of the Tomorrowland Speedway and the guests driving the race cars.

Panned photo of a race car on the Tomorrowland Speedway in the Magic Kingdom, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida.
Panned photo of a race car on the Tomorrowland Speedway.
Nikon D70/18-200VR, 1/16s, f/16, ISO 200, EV -0.3, 130mm Focal Length

Later that day, we all convened at Aunt Polly's on Tom Sawyer Island for the Welcome Meet hosted by Tim Devine. He went over what he expected from Pixelmania attendees which was to have fun and use this opportunity to learn from each other in a loose atmosphere. Oh, and while we were on Tom Sawyer's Island, we got some great photos of Tiana's Showboat Jubilee! as it rounded the bend to return to port.

Tiana's Showboat Jubilee comes around the bend in the Magic Kingdom, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida.
Tiana's Showboat Jubilee comes around the bend in the Magic Kingdom.
Nikon D70/18-200VR, 1/500s, f/5.3, ISO 200, EV +0.3, 95mm Focal Length

Friday's Pixelmania events had to deal with rain...lots of it. However, since we were at Epcot for the day, it didn't effect the World Showcase Tour much as we used tripods, flash and techniques to capture the interiors of Mexico, Norway, China and the American Adventure. Another nice thing about photographing with other photographers is you are not rushed. We took in the American Adventure twice as the crowds were low. The second time we sat close enough so I could use my fastest lens, the Nifty Fifty. Using my tripod as a monopod (legs folded in), I caught this scene of President Theodore Roosevelt discussing conservation issues with John Muir.

President Theodore Roosevelt and John Muir during the American Adventure in Epcot's World Showcase, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida.
President Theodore Roosevelt and John Muir during the American Adventure.
Nikon D70/50mm, 1/30s, f/2.8, ISO 800, EV 0, 50mm Focal Length

The rain just would not stop so the planned Illuminations Fireworks meet was postponed until the next evening. I did not attend as I had a previous dinner reservation elsewhere. I will provide the links to the Pixelmania websites at the bottom of this post so you can see how others photographed the events I did and did not attend.

The next day, Saturday, it was back to Disney's Animal Kingdom for morning and afternoon meets. I skipped the morning Kilimanjaro Safari and Pangani Forest Trail meets as it was still raining and I had done those earlier in the week. I did attend the Maharajah Jungle Trek meet. I even scouted it out beforehand. I don't know if it was the cooler than normal weather but the animals were very active. The tigers were very playful. I caught this tiger just as he was starting to run after another.

A tiger starting to run at another on the Maharajah Jungle Trek in Disney's Animal Kingdom, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida.
A tiger starting to run at another on the Maharajah Jungle Trek.
Nikon D70/70-200VR, 1/250s, f/4, ISO 200, EV +0.3, 200mm Focal Length

With all of us photographing the tigers, there was a lot covered from panned shots of tigers at full speed, head butting, chases and other interesting behaviors.

The last day of Pixelmania brought more fun and surprises. First, Tim had arranged for some Disney Cast Members to give us a photo scavenger hunt in Disney's Hollywood Studios. By luck of the draw, we were put into three teams of four and given envelopes which contained five close up photos of things between Animation Court and Lights, Motors, Action Extreme Stunt Show entrance. Basically, up and down Pixar Place (the old Mickey Avenue). This was an extremely fun event and I was lucky enough to have teammates who knew the location of all but one of the photos. The last one was a toughie which we finally found inside the Walt Disney: One Man's Dream attraction. We only had ninety minutes to complete the task as we needed to get ready for the Lights, Motors, Action meet.

This is where Tim Devine sprung a huge surprise on us. He had arranged for us to sit in the VIP Seating Area for the 1:20pm showing of the Lights, Motors, Action! Extreme Stunt Show. This gave over a dozen Disney loving photographers a front and center view of the entire set. The VIP Seating is right behind the control room for the show and no one sits in front of you. In other words, I did not have to worry about a random head or arm getting in the way as I was shooting. Oh, did I say front and center? How's this?

The explosive finale of the Lights, Motors, Action Extreme Stunt Show in Disney's Hollywood Studios, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida.
The explosive finale of the Lights, Motors, Action Extreme Stunt Show.
Nikon D70/18-200VR, 1/400s, f/9, ISO 200, EV 0, 24mm Focal Length

I had to leave right after this event to catch my Magical Express bus back to the airport. To see the rest of the meets and more of the meets I did attend, check out these links:

Pixelmania! board in the Magic In Pixels Forum

Pixelmania! flickr Group

December 12, 2009

Slurp!

Focus on Disney World by Barrie Brewer

Goats at Rafiki's Planet Watch
Copyright © 2009 Barrie Brewer, Nikon D300, 18-200VR lens, 1/320 sec, f/9, ISO 400

I love goats. They have so much personality. You can get up close and personal with them at Rafiki's Planet Watch in Disney's Animal Kingdom. Just watch out for those tongues.

December 13, 2009

Where in the World is Barrie?

Focus on Disney World by Barrie Brewer

Hi everyone! In case you missed my note last week, I am on vacation and won't be posting a Where in the World challenge this week. That means you still have time to enter last week's challenge!

See you next on December 20!

December 15, 2009

Disney Pic of the Week - Streets of Disney's Hollywood Studios

Light Meter by Lisa K. Berton

Disney's Hollywood Studios conjurs up those big dreams many have of seeing their name up in lights and becoming the huge celebrity they long to be. As a matter of fact, you'll even meet some of these Citizens of Hollywood as you roam Sunset Blvd and Hollywood Blvd.

The park's layout is made up of streets, courtyards, and a lake rather than lands. No matter where you turn, you're reminded of the fantasy, glitz, glamour, and fame that Hollywood, California creates.

This time around Barrie, Scott, and I will walk you down a few of these streets today, Thursday, and Saturday. Join our tour, won't you.

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Canon PowerShot SX100 IS.

Reflected in this permanently parked vintage car on Sunset Boulevard (much cleaner than the real one) are shops Villains in Vogue (left) and Beverly Sunset. With plenty of benches to enjoy and get off your feet, you're sure to see a star or two walk by.

December 16, 2009

Watch the Bunny

Light Meter by Lisa K. Berton

What you are about to see will change your life forever. You'll be amazed at how one little blog posesses such power or you'll see right through my self-congratulatory journalism. Either way...you'll be astounded.

When you are photographing people, places, and things, you can create various emotions and feelings simply by how and where you place your subject in the frame. Generally speaking, most amateur shutterbugs place their subject in the center. We're going to branch out and explore other options and compare how each photo has a different feel from the next.

For this blog I found a new model, someone who is excellent at taking direction, doesn't let direct sunlight bother him, and didn't ask for a single break. As this was a one-time agreement, enjoy his modeling skills because it's the only time he'll be posing for me but you could certainly get him to work with you the next time you visit Disneyland.

At first we place Mr. Hunny Bunny in the top left-hand corner of the frame. There isn't a great amount of space between his head and the top of the photo making it seem that whatever he's looking at is directly above him. Having all that empty space behind him conjurs up the premise that he's unaware of what's behind him. With so much of the pillar base in the shot, projecting towards the lens, it feels like Mr. Hunny Bunny is close enough to touch.

What if Judge Doom snuck up behind him and clutched him in his hand with the intent of dropping him into a vat of Dip? Stop looking at me like I'm loca.

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By panning up and cutting back on how much of the base is shown we've given Mr. Hunny Bunny a new premise. He's now looking up at something that's further away. There's space in front of him giving him room to hop away if need be. I'm just sayin'.

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Mr. Hunny Bunny sits off-center of the frame, blissfully looking up at something. He could easily move forward especially since we can view both feet. Due to so much headroom (space above one's head), Mr. Hunny Bunny feels like he's further away than he actually is and that there's great distance between him and what he's staring at.

I find that it looks as though he's stretching his neck up more than in the other shots. Obviously there isn't a hare of a chance of that happening but angles create various perspectives.

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Sitting nice and tall centerstage, our furry friend appears to be closer, now that a bit more of the base is in the frame and the corner is just off-center. Another reason he seems to be closer is because there's less headroom than in the last photo.

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Lastly, my supermodel, in the bottom righthand corner of the picture has the freedom to roam the area in front of him. Since he's looking straight up and he's got hardly any place to go behind him, I fear that his looking up and slightly back may lead him to fall backwards out of the photograph...leaving him with cartoon stars and birds circling above his bumped head.

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You may get completely different and sane feelings than what I perceive from these photos and that's alright. The next time you have time, try doing this yourself. Put those kids to work or get your spouse to model for you. Good luck gettin' any of them to hold still as well as Mr. Hunny Bunny.

Useless info: I always listen to music when I write my blogs to get my creative energy flowing. This entry was written while listening to the album A Medio Vivir by Ricky Martin.

Happy Hanukkah! May all your dreidel spins land on Gimel, your gelt easy to unwrap, and your latkes be greaseless. Shalom!

Yes, I'm on facebook. I can be found by searching for Lisa K Berton. Don't forget the middle initial.

December 17, 2009

Sunset Boulevard in December

Focus on Disney World by Barrie Brewer

 Sunset Boulevard in Disney's Hollywood Studios
Copyright © 2007 Barrie Brewer, Nikon D50, 18-200VR lens, 1/5 sec, f/8, ISO 800

Sunset Boulevard in Disney's Hollywood Studios, all decked out for the holiday season.

December 18, 2009

Walt Disney World in HDR

Photographic Innoventions by Scott Thomas

High Dynamic Range imaging which is referred to simply as HDR is a process to increase the amount of luminance between the lightest and darkest areas of an image. Digital cameras can handle from 4 to 7 stops of light. In contrast, the human eye can see 20 stops of light. People "see" in HDR. Photographers for years have done all kinds of things in the darkrooms to increase their photos dynamic range.

With the advent of more powerful personal computers, digital cameras and imaging software, photographers and software engineers created the HDR process of merging a set of digital photographs which would have taken hours of setup in a darkroom and do it in just a few minutes. Today's blog is just an introduction to HDR as I have recently discovered it myself.

There are two kinds of HDR images. One is created by a set of images I call an HDR set. The second is created from one image which I will cover in three weeks. So, what is an HDR set? To explain that I first have to introduce you to the term bracketing. In photography, bracketing means to take one picture at a given exposure then one or two brighter and one or two darker, in order to obtain the best image. I did this often whenever I was using slide film. Digital sensors are a lot like slide film so when I took up digital photography, I returned to bracketing, especially if the the subject I was photographing had very light and dark areas.

HDR imaging takes bracketing a bit further. Instead of changing a half or a full stop around an exposure, HDR photographers go 2, 3 and sometimes more stops. Digital cameras make it very easy as most come with auto-bracketing settings which will program your camera to take a series of photos plus and minus around the exposure the photographer decides to start with. Auto-bracketing can be truly automatic where one shutter press takes all the photos in sequence or, like my older digital camera, you have to press the shutter for each bracketed photo. To find out how your camera does auto-bracketing, check its manual (haven't bugged you about reading that in awhile!).

Now that you have an idea of what HDR is. Let me show you how it works. Most HDR books and web tutorials recommend you start with a 3 image bracket of +2, 0, -2 EV (exposure compensation). When I turn on auto-bracketing, the first shutter press will take the +2 EV photo first, the 0 EV photo second and the -2 EV photo last. This gives me the HDR set of 3 photos you see below of Expedition Everest from the bridge to Africa in Disney's Animal Kingdom.

HDR set of photos of Expedition Everest in Disney's Animal Kingdom, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida
HDR set of photos of Expedition Everest in Disney's Animal Kingdom.

When I first started doing this I had to get used to seeing such light and dark images and to NOT delete them which I did the first few times. Once you get the HDR set onto your computer the real fun begins. A couple of years ago, you really needed something like Photoshop to merge the HDR sets together. Most HDR gurus today recommend Photomatix either as a stand along program or plugins for Photoshop, Lightroom or Apple's Aperture. Since I use Aperture, I'll explain how easy it is to use the Photomatix plugin. If you get the stand alone version, Photomatix Pro, you have to create the JPEG images for it.

In Aperture, I selected the three images you see above and choose to edit with the Photomatix plugin. This launches Photomatix and imports the three images. Since I didn't use a tripod here, I told Photomatix to align the images. After a minute or less, the merged image is displayed in the plugin. The first time you see this you'll be amazed. Dark and light areas which in the "properly" exposed image had little to no detail, now have detail. The links below will go into more detail as to what all the adjustment sliders in Photomatix does. After a few minutes, below is what I ended up with. Notice how you can see details in the bright clouds and dark green foliage. In my normal processing, I would have had a hard time getting something even close to this.

Expedition Everest from the bridge to Africa in Disney's Animal Kingdom in HDR, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida
Expedition Everest from the bridge to Africa in HDR.

Remember, HDR works best with scenes which have very dark and/or very light areas. If the scene is very evenly lighted, HDR won't do much for you. With that in mind, lighted structures at night have a large contrast in light and dark. I had seen others do HDR images of Spaceship Earth at Epcot but I thought I would give it a try and see what I came up with. Below is the HDR set of three images. This time, I decided to do it manually by using my camera's light meter and a tripod. I kept the ISO at 200 and aperture at f/16 and varied the shutter speed to get the same exposure range of +/- 2 stops.

HDR set of photos of Spaceship Earth in Epcot's Future World, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida
HDR set of photos of Spaceship Earth in Epcot's Future World.

Night HDR processing was a lot harder than I thought it would be. HDR increases noise. So, if you start with ISO 200 images, the HDR image turns out like an ISO 400 image. In very dark areas, like a night sky, noise can become very apparent. After a long time, I finally came upon the settings to keep the night sky black and not a grainy brown. The result you see below.

Nighttime HDR of Spaceship Earth in Epcot's Future World, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida
Nighttime HDR of Spaceship Earth in Epcot's Future World.

When HDR images first appeared, they were panned as being too cartoonish and not very realistic. As software engineers and photographers improved the tools and techniques, HDR images got better and better. For fun, you can still create those extreme HDR images like the one I did below of the set of the Lights, Motors, Action Extreme Stunt Show in Disney's Hollywood Studios.

Extreme HDR of set of the Lights, Motors, Action Extreme Stunt Show in Disney's Hollywood Studios, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida
Extreme HDR of set of the Lights, Motors, Action Extreme Stunt Show.

To me, this looks like concept art which might have been seen in the offices of Disney Imagineering when they were creating the show. What do you think? For more HDR examples from Walt Disney World, click here.

I have been rather vague as to how to use Photomatix. This is because like all photo editing software, there are no wrong or right ways to create an HDR image once it's in Photomatix. Below are some links which will explain further how to create HDR photos using Photomatix.

Stuck In Customs HDR Tutorial - Trey Ratcliff is considered a master of HDR photography.

HDR Tutorial by Pete Carr - goes into how adjustment sliders in Photomatix effect an image. (This is an update from the original link.)

HDRsoft's website - the maker of Photomatix which have 30 day trials of the stand alone and plugin versions for download.

Stuart Perry's Photomatix Presets - I know it's early but this is my Christmas gift to anyone who wants to try out Photomatix. This link has a download with over 80 presets you can use in Photomatix. It's a great way to see how each preset changes your images while in Photomatix. Enjoy!

December 19, 2009

Hollywood & Vine Traffic Light

Photographic Innoventions by Scott Thomas

The famous Hollywood and Vine intersection as found in Disney's Hollywood Studios, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida

The famous Hollywood and Vine intersection.
Nikon D70/18-200VR, 1/200s, f/7.1, ISO 200, EV +0.3, 55mm Focal Length

In the Magic Kingdom, there are lands. In Epcot, worlds. In Disney's Hollywood Studios, you have famous streets like Hollywood Blvd., Vine St. and Sunset Blvd. As an added touch, Disney Imagineers put an old time working traffic light at the intersection of it's Hollywood and Vine for my Disney Pic of the Week on Disney's Hollywood Studios' Streets.

December 20, 2009

Where in the World #114

Focus on Disney World by Barrie Brewer

This was Challenge #113:
 Where in the World #113

And here's the answer:
Osborne Family Spectacle of Dancing Lights
Copyright © 2007 Barrie Brewer, Nikon D50, 18-200VR, 1.6s shutter, f/8, ISO 800

Season's Greetings to you all! I thought this was a good week for a picture of the Osborne Family Spectacle of Dancing Lights. Five million lights sure look beautiful decorating the Streets of America in Disney's Hollywood Studios. It is truly an awe-inspiring show.

Dave Wang was the first to send in the correct answer for the challenge! Congratulations to Dave and all the other readers who got the answer right: Louise Barton, Robin Fitts, Scott Otis, Mckinley Yeaman, David Manning, Wendy Ip, Sharon Dale, Sarah Haas, Jen Cerce, Elizabeth Collins, Derek Mullins, Jerry Weldon, John C. Lacasse, Jeffrey Beauchamp, Brian Haas, Aubrey Cooper, Heidi Summers, Bill Androckitis Jr., Josh Kight, Double Family, Lee Anastasi, Clarence Diggles, Scott Cullen, Belicia Dawson, Annette Nuenke, Carrie Henderson, Jennifer Tremley, Jared Orth, Bruce Lawson, Jason Skow, Sue Mcdonald, Kelley H, Tim Rachuba, Wendy Snelgrove, Michael Nanney, Julie Wickware, Aruna, Gary E Genteman, Jay Reagan, Carri Marotto, Katarina Whitmarsh, Heather Coursen, Jennifer Schwing, Paul Cooper, Sharon Lee, Maureen Ohare, Sharon Pierce, Brian Miller, Daniel Record, Katy M. Robinson, James Berry, Kathy Berry, Jessica Deans, Jamie Poynton, Christine and Annie Goodenbour. Each of you will be entered in the December winners' drawing.
_______________________________________________________________________

Challenge #114: Where in the world is this?

 Where in the World #114

Do you know? Do you have a guess? Due to the holiday this week, please send in your answer, before the end of the day on Wednesday, December 23, by clicking on the blue box below. Please do not post answers using the Feedback Form link at the bottom of this post. Remember to be specific with your answer - just naming a park will not get you into the drawing.

Click Here to Submit Your Answer
_______________________________________________________________________

Everyone who sends in a correct answer to a Where in the World Challenge this month will be entered in a drawing at the end of the month for some special AllEars® goodies and a cool Disney book!

December 22, 2009

Disney Pic of the Week - France

Focus on Disney World by Barrie Brewer

Visit the France pavilion in Epcot's World Showcase and you'll be transported back to the beautiful city of Paris of the late 1800's. Here you will see the mansard roofs and dormers that are so recognizable as Parisian architecture. Above the fountains and arcade entrances, the Eiffel Tower lets you know that you have arrived in Paris, the most romantic city in the world. Join Scott, Lisa and I this week as we take a look at Disney's take on this breathtaking city.

Pere Noel
Copyright © 2006 Barrie Brewer, Nikon D50, 18-200VR lens, 1/500 sec, f/5

Children eagerly await le Pere Noel (Father Christmas), who arrives on Christmas Eve to deliver wonderful presents. During the holiday season in Epcot, Pere Noel tells the story of Christmas in France as part of Holidays Around the World.

December 23, 2009

I Pahked My Cah in Hollywood Studios

Light Meter by Lisa K. Berton

Every now and again I go into a park with a theme in mind. On an overly bright, sunny, and hazy day I decided to photograph the various parked prop cars at Disney's Hollywood Studios. Unfortunately, I picked the wrong day to photograph shiny, reflective surfaces as it lead me to shoot while squinting or with one eye closed. Yay for me? :shakes head in disbelief: Kids, don't try this at home. Wait until some clouds move in and you can actually see what you're doing.

This experiment was conducted with a Canon Powershot SX100 IS.

Let's recap my brilliant idea.

I started out with this truck over by Sid Cahuenga's One-of-a-Kind.
lkb-car-sidcahuenga.jpg
This was the best view I could get as shooting from the other side proved to be far worse as far as ghosting goes. Ghosting is a digital photography term referring to the white cloudy/hazy spots that gleam off of highlights and look like ghostly figures.

Next I moved onto Oscar's Super Station. lkb-car-oscars.jpg
My goal was to shoot through the window to get the interior of the front seat. Three photos later of holding the camera up and at an angle where I couldn't really see anything and all I got was a bad blend of the steering wheel and everyone standing behind me. The picture you see here I took while squinting and it's soft. I used Adobe Photoshop CS4 to sharpen it.

Strolling down Hollywood Blvd and turning right onto Sunset Blvd, this car was parked in front of the store Legends.
lkb-car-legends.jpg
Thankfully it was under an awning. That certainly helped cut down on the blinding reflections. This is a far stronger image than the previous ones with good contrast,

Further down the left-hand side of the street you'll find this taxi beside to a Disney Vaction Club kiosk.
lkb-car-citycab.jpg
I moved around a little to try and angle my shot so it looked like the cab was driving into the street. Aside from barely being able to see the LCD screen in the direct sunlight, it was near impossible on such a busy day to avoid pedestrians crossing in front.

Sci-Fi Drive-In has this convertible sitting out front. It's the only prop car you can climb into unless of course you dine at the restaurant.
lkb-car-SciFi.jpg
The shadows were rather harsh so I had to lighten them up. Do you see the Disney name on the the hood? The front of this car makes me think of a fish's mouth for some reason.

My last stop was at Backlot Express where this Toon Patrol mobster-looking car waits for the traffic light to change.
lkb-car-toonpatrol.jpg
The counter service restaurant is covered from the elements but has the perfect amount of natural lighting. I find that photographing cars in this manner, close-up, and from the front gives them more personality.

What theme will you try on your next vacation?

This blog was written while listening to Michael Jackson's This Is It soundtrack.

December 24, 2009

Kiosque à Journaux

Photographic Innoventions by Scott Thomas

Kiosque à journaux (news kiosk) in the France pavilion in Epcot's World Showcase., Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida

Kiosque à journaux (news kiosk) in the France pavilion.
Nikon D70/18-200VR, 20s, f/16, ISO 200, EV -0.7, 24mm Focal Length, Tripod

Kiosque à journaux or news kiosk are found throughout Paris. It's a great detail the Disney Imagineers caught and added to the France pavilion in Epcot's World Showcase. I thought it would make a good Disney Pic of the Week on France.

December 25, 2009

Christmas Wish 2009

Photographic Innoventions by Scott Thomas

Rainbow colors light up Cinderella Castle during the Christmas holiday celebration at the Magic Kingdom, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida

Rainbow colors light up Cinderella Castle during the Christmas holidays.
Nikon D70/18-200VR, 1/15s, f/3.5, ISO 1250, EV +0.3, 18mm Focal Length

From Barrie, Lisa and myself, have a Merry Christmas!

I'll be taking next week off but will be back for another year of Disney photography here on the Picture This! blog.

December 26, 2009

Bienvenue vers la France

Light Meter by Lisa K. Berton

Bonjour. Well that wraps up my knowledge of the French language. Sad, I know.

As you cross over the bridge in Epcot from United Kingdom you will see France. Seriously, it's true. Granted an extremely scaled down version of France but France nonetheless. There's even a replica of Le Eiffel Tower which you cannot scale unless you are a Smurf, a Wuzzle or a Shirt Tale.

In France you'll find pastries, wine, perfume, a rat chef, and the beautiful film entitled Impressions de France. For your entertainment, I present my Disney Pic of the Week.

lkb-France-overview.jpg

Bon provecho! Ooh, I remembered something else in French, a little song called Dur Dur D'etre Bebe by a little boy named Jordy.

December 27, 2009

Where in the World #115

Focus on Disney World by Barrie Brewer

This was Challenge #114:
 Where in the World #114

And here's the answer:
African Fishing Boats at Disney's Animal Kingdom
Copyright © 2009 Barrie Brewer, Nikon D300, 18-200VR, 1/5000s shutter, f/3.5, ISO 400

You may never have noticed these fishing boats along the riverside unless you've ventured over to the wall along the side of the Dawa Bar in Disney's Animal Kingdom. Over the edge, you can catch a glimpse of the day's catch.

Sharon Dale was the first to send in the correct answer for the challenge! Congratulations to Sharon and all the other readers who got the answer right: Robert Anderson, Sherry Klinefelter, Jeremy Hardy, Rick Ivnik, Kevin, Tim Rachuba, Jennifer Paolino, Aruna, Cameron Lange, Bev Carson, Gary E Genteman and Brian Haas. Each of you were entered in the December winners' drawing.

It's time for the monthly drawing. This month's big winner is Kevin, the same Kevin who got the challenge above correct! Congratulations Kevin, you are the lucky recipient of a fabulous Disney book and some really cool AllEars schwag!

Good luck to everyone as we begin another month! Here we go"

_______________________________________________________________________

Challenge #115: Where in the world is this?

 Where in the World #115

Do you know? Do you have a guess? Please send in your answer, before the end of the day on Thursday, December 31, by clicking on the blue box below. Please do not post answers using the Feedback Form link at the bottom of this post. Remember to be specific with your answer - just naming a park will not get you into the drawing.

Click Here to Submit Your Answer
_______________________________________________________________________

Everyone who sends in a correct answer to a Where in the World Challenge this month will be entered in a drawing at the end of the month for some special AllEars® goodies and a cool Disney book!

December 29, 2009

Disney Pic of the Week: Leading Lines

Photographic Innoventions by Scott Thomas

Lines in photography are used to lead the eye to the point of interest and prevent the eye from wandering. Lines can put emphasis on distance or illustrate a relationship to foreground and background elements. Lines can be straight. Lines can be curved like the monorail tracks I photographed from the front of an express monorail headed towards the Contemporary Resort.

Monorail tracks heading towards the Contemporary Resort, Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida
Monorail tracks heading towards the Contemporary Resort.
Nikon D70/18-200VR, 1/200s, f/11, ISO 200, EV -0.3, 18mm Focal Length

Come back on Thursday and Saturday to see Barrie and Lisa's take on our Disney Pic of the Week on Leading Lines.

December 30, 2009

Travel Year in Review

Light Meter by Lisa K. Berton

2009 has been a year of revisiting my favorite place on Earth, twice, a return trip to another fun destination, a new and interesting local, and a staycation that reunited me with an old friend. Time to review my travels.

In March I returned to California to celebrate my birthday at Disneyland. Once again, I stayed with my longtime friend Yoli, her husband, and stepson. Via a friend of hers, we dined at the impressive members-only Club 33, not once but twice. I partied with my CA posse Lisa & family, Drina, Jenn, Virginia, Jen & Corey, and "Cousin" Jenny. At Paradise Pier Hotel I reconnected over dinner with former co-workers, managers Hector & Katrina, and my ex-roomie Tina. Add to all of that a complimentary upgrade from a standard view room to a suite facing Disney's California Adventure at Paradise Pier Hotel and you have the makings of an unforgettable birthday but I forget things so I wrote about it for future reference.

lkb-09recap-DL-SnowScaryAdv.jpg
Snow White's Scary Adventure begins en route to the attic! Da-da-daaaaaa.

lkb-09recap-charactercrossing.jpg
Outside of Goofy's Kitchen you'll find this sign and it's true! In fact, about every 30 minutes you'll find characters passing thru.

lkb-09recap-orange.jpg
The Orange Stinger is no more. I only hope the new attraction also allows me to fly thru the air while posing like Peter Pan or Superman.

August was crazy fun because my trips were back-to-back. First, I drove to Cape Cod because my friend Ashley and his band HERE II HERE were touring and had 3 shows scheduled at churches in Hyannis and Brewster, MA. After the first show during which the boys laughed at me (long story, they were just reacting to my behavior) we went out for lunch. Then I dropped my bags at my aunt & uncle's, had a bite to eat, and then went off to the 2nd show. The next day Ashley and I hung out, shopped, and went out for lunch. It was awesome to spend quality time with him. He went off to prepare for their 3rd show and I drove home.

lkb-09recap-hereiihere.jpg
Left to right: Edwin, Jaime, Ashley, Alex, and Kaz finish the show by singing a capella.

lkb-09recap-ash.jpg
It was Ash who introduced me to the phrase "for reals" so if you ever hear me say it, blame him.

Two days later I flew over to Wisconsin for the very first time to visit my friend Tracy and her son Zach. It was during this trip that I declared myself her parents' adopted Jewish daughter. What a wonderful family they are. Tracy, her boyfriend Ken, Zach, and I set out on adventure. We explored caverns, sought out trolls, learned about mustard, found a rain-soaked Little Norway (we left), a dry Little Switzerland (we stayed), Henry Vilas Zoo, and a quirky deli named Ella's.

lkb-09recap-WIcavern.jpg
Isn't it amazing how these caverns were formed with lights already installed as well as stairs and handrails.

lkb-09recap-WIcapital.jpg
As we drove around the State Capitol Building and I was trying my best to lean left across Zach and shoot thru the open window I kept saying, "Look kids, Big Ben!"

lkb-09recap-WIcowtip.jpg
A visit to Wisconsin just isn't complete without cow tipping.

Way, way back in September you may recall I brought my mom and her best friend, Judi, to Walt Disney World to celebrate their 60th birthdays. We stayed off-site :gasp: and had to pay for parking :faint:. With the exception of the heat and humidity, we had a great time and my mom finally got to meet my friend Amy. Also, we discovered a fantastic dining establishment at Crossroads, Sweet Tomatoes.

lkb-09recap-feedducks.jpg
A Cast Member at Disney's Animal Kingdom fed lettuce to the duckies and then weighed them. The ducks, I mean, she didn't weigh the lettuce. Well, far as I'm aware she didn't.

lkb-09recap-hiddenmickey.jpg
Are you as bad as I am at finding hidden Mickeys? Do what AllEars team member Glo from Miami did, kick a few small rocks together and create your own.

lkb-09recap-mitchelmusso.jpg
If you have a teenage daughter who watches "Hannah Montana" then you already know this is Mitchel Musso, one of the Disney Channel's singing actors. I'll apologize now if you show her this photo and she lets out a high-pitch scream.

My second journey to California was in October and because she doesn't know any better, Yoli let me stay with and her familia again. This time we went to Hollywood and Beverly Hills where we proceeded to get lost for a while. We had a great time being goofballs on Rodeo Drive. You can bet I went to Disneyland, in fact, AllEars held it's first meet there. Rock on! A large group of us took part in walking and fundraising for Children's Hospital of Orange County.

lkb-09recap-rodeoshop.jpg
I can't recall which store this is however I do remember making cracks about couture-clothed cops coming after us.

lkb-09recap-shagadelic.jpg
If you are interested in touring a movie studio I highly recommend the Warner Bros. VIP Tour. Yeah, baby, yeah.

lkb-09recap-bullelephant.jpg
If you haven't heard the song Skipper Dan by "Weird" Al Yankovic yet or you want to hear it again, and again, and agaaaaain, click here.

That's it unless I run off between now and tomorrow but I seriously doubt I will because I plan to start a road trip on Saturday.

Thanks for all of your comments and feedback. I know Barrie and Scott appreciate them as much as I do. Happy New Year. Próspero Año Nuevo. Here we go! Ale, ale, ale!

I'm on facebook. Are you? Lisa K Berton is the name and Scattergories is my game.

This blog was written while listening to The Monkees' Headquarters.

December 31, 2009

Lead on, I Follow

Light Meter by Lisa K. Berton

Happy New Year! Happy New Year! Happy, Happy New Year to you! For those of you familiar with Disneyland, sing that to the tune played during My Disneyland Birthday Party at Plaza Inn. You'll be singing it all day long.

Alrighty, let's get on to our Disney Pic of the Week theme, leading lines. More often than not, photographs demonstrating this subject bring your attention to a focal point by drawing your eye in via lines. It is also possible to create leading lines that carry you out of the photograph.

Today, I make use out of several leading lines that do just that, lead your eye out of the image. Also, one of my lines isn't common. Check this out.

lkb-leadinglines-CMs.jpg

Cast Members dressed in Disneyland Railroad attire line up and act as Do Not Cross lines during the Flag Retreat Ceremony. The late afternoon sun overhead projects their shadows in front of them and trolley tracks intersect the Cast Members' direction taking you elsewhere. Tadaaaaa!

Happy New Year. Happy New Year. Happy, Happy New Year to you.

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About December 2009

This page contains all entries posted to Picture This! in December 2009. They are listed from oldest to newest.

November 2009 is the previous archive.

January 2010 is the next archive.

Many more can be found on the main index page or by looking through the archives.