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February 25, 2014

Aulani - Part Two

Jack Spence Masthead


Welcome back to my discussion of Aulani, a combination hotel/Disney Vacation Club (DVC) located on the island of Oahu in Hawaii. Yesterday I gave you an overview of the many wonderful amenities this resort has to offer. Today I'm going to answer the $64,000 question. Would I recommend Aulani to first-time visitors to Hawaii, specifically first time visitors to Oahu?

Maybe.

If you're DVC member then the answer is easy. You've already bought and paid for your points. You might as well use them here. There is no way around it, Hawaii is very expensive. Why pay for another non-Disney hotel if you've already got a place to stay. But if you're not a DVC member, the answer is not so easy.


Disney Vacation Club


There is no denying, Aulani is a beautiful resort. If it was located anywhere in the Waikiki area, I would recommend it in a heartbeat. But it's not. It's located in a somewhat remote section of Oahu, an area with not all that much to see and experience. And other than the J.W. Marriott Ilihani hotel that neighbors Aulani, there is very little within walking distance. Maybe in the future there will be, but not now. I understand that there are a three restaurants across the street, but this wouldn't offer most guests the variety needed to fill an entire week's stay. That means that if you want to eat anywhere besides the immediate area, you're out of luck unless you rent a car or take a taxi.


Map to Aulani


How about shopping opportunities? First, there is the limited selection of goods to be found at the Aulani shops. There are also a few shops down the road at Ko Olina Station. But this second option is lacking in retailers and requires a car for transportation. There are a few shopping opportunities within a five mile radius of Aulani, but again, the variety of goods is limited and some sort of transportation is required to get there.

On the other hand, Waikiki and other venues in South Oahu have an abundance of shopping opportunities worth your time. Kalakaua Avenue, which parallels Waikiki Beach, is a shopper's paradise with countless clothing shops, art galleries, jewelry stores, camera and electronics retailers, souvenir stands, and anything else you can imagine. The Ala Moana Shopping Center (over 290 shops and restaurants) is another favorite of those with money to spend. By the way, no first-timer should miss shopping for an aloha shirt at Hilo Hattie's or a tacky souvenir at one of the dozens of ABC Stores found all over the island. Sure it's touristy, but that's part of the fun.


Kalakaua Avenue

Kalakaua Avenue

Ala Moana

Hilo Hattie's

ABC Store


Honolulu and Waikiki are also the areas to find an abundance of restaurants. This includes everything from fast-food chains to first-class establishments and everything in-between. The options are endless.

To further illustrate my point, I picked up one of those glossy tourist magazines promoting Oahu while I was in Honolulu. Most of the magazine is made up of advertisements placed by the various tour companies, hotels, shops, and restaurants found on the island (including a full-page back-cover ad for Aulani). Also contained in the magazine is a legitimate tourist guide and maps that tries to give first-time visitors an idea of what there is to see and do here. This guide has divided the island into five sections, North, South (which contains Honolulu and Waikiki), East (which contains Aulani), West, and Central. Over half of the magazine is devoted to the South section of the island. The rest of the magazine covers the other four sections.


Aulani Full Page Back Cover Ad


So let's say you decide you want to drive from Aulani to Waikiki for a meal or shopping. Well as I said at the beginning of this article, it's about 27 miles away. That may not sound so bad, but this equates to at least a 45 minute drive when traffic is good. And believe me when I say, Honolulu has bumper to bumper traffic during rush hour just like any other major city (metro population: 953,207). Maybe even more so due to the congested nature of this small island. So a trip to Waikiki during busy times will take you an hour plus. And by the way, the scenery is not particularly picturesque along this route. A taxi will cost you between $75 and $100 one way depending on the time of day. A taxi from the airport to Aulani will run between $50 and $75. Ouch. If you rent a car, good luck finding a parking space in the Waikiki area.

So why is Aulani located so far away from everything?

Disney is a very late comer to the Hawaiian vacation game. All of the islands' prime real estate locations were snatched up decades ago by their competition.

Of course, staying at Aulani doesn't mean you can't see and do all of the wonderful things offered to you on Oahu, it's just going to take more time, more money, and more effort to do so.

Another thing I don't like about Aulani is its lack of a swimmable beach on the ocean. If I just flew five hours across the Pacific to get to the islands, I would have bodysurfing on the mind. I want to swim in the ocean with real waves. Aulani's pristine cove is very beautiful, but its waves wouldn't knock a learning-to-walk toddler down.

To Disney's credit, they have steered Aulani away from the stereotypical Hawaii clichés that some of the other Hawaiian resorts sometimes perpetuate. You won't find tiki torches, Elvis singing "Blue Hawaii," or plastic leis at Aulani. But on the other hand, some of this kitsch can be sort of fun on your first trip to the islands. Once again, it's touristy, but that's not always a bad thing depending on what you're looking for. After all, the Polynesian Resort at WDW has tiki torches and fake leis.

I know it might sound trite, but a lot of people dream of seeing Diamond Head in the background while they swim, eat, and shop. Only a handful of rooms at Aulani can even see this famous volcano. And for those that can, it's so far away that it loses much of its charm. You can't see Diamond Head at all from the Aulani pool, 'AMA 'AMA restaurant, or beach cove.

On this most recent trip to Oahu, I made reservations to eat dinner at Hula Grill, an upscale restaurant located at the Outrigger Hotel on Waikiki Beach. Besides enjoying one of the most scrumptious meals and Mai Tai I've had in ages, this is the view I had from my table.


Hula Grill

Hula Grill


Here is a picture of me taken from the Hanohano Room on the 30th floor of the Waikiki Sheraton. I'm the indistinguishable blur at the bottom of the picture - but the view of Diamond Head is magnificent. You can't take a picture anything like this at Aulani.


Hanohano Room


What scares me about recommending Aulani is the Disney Marketing Machine. I've seen this entity convince an amazing number of first-time cruisers that the Disney Cruise Line is the best line afloat. I've talked with countless people who have never, and would never sail on anything other than Disney.

Don't get me wrong, I think the Disney Cruise Line is excellent. I've sailed on both the Magic and the Wonder. They have a fantastic product and I recommend them often. But contrary to what Disney will have you believe, their competition is also excellent with a lot to offer. Notice I sailed on Princess Cruise Lines on my latest vacation.

I'm afraid this same "cruise line" mentality will take hold with Aulani. I'm afraid Disney will convince first-time Hawaiian vacationers that if they don't select Aulani, they're settling for something less. After all, Disney implies that they have "a touch of magic" that everyone else is lacking. Trust me. I have stayed at several Hawaiian resorts that are far more elegant and luxurious than Aulani - and their employees equaled any Disney cast member in terms of service and friendliness. These resorts might not have had Mickey Mouse and a lazy river, but that's not why I vacation in Hawaii. I go to Orlando and Anaheim for Mickey and the gang. I go to Hawaii to experience Hawaii.

Here are a few pictures of the resorts I've stayed at in the islands.

Sheraton Waikiki


Sheraton Waikiki

Sheraton Waikiki


Hilton Waikoloa


Hyatt Regency Waikoloa

Hyatt Regency Waikoloa

Hyatt Regency Waikoloa

Hyatt Regency Waikoloa

Hyatt Regency Waikoloa

Hyatt Regency Waikoloa


Kauai Marriott Resort


Kauai Marriott Resort

Kauai Marriott Resort

Kauai Marriott Resort

Kauai Marriott Resort


Hyatt Regency Maui


Hyatt Regency Maui

Hyatt Regency Maui

Hyatt Regency Maui

Hyatt Regency Maui

Hyatt Regency Maui

Hyatt Regency Maui

Hyatt Regency Maui


Taking this thought even further, Disney wants you to return to Aulani year after year. Don't believe me? Here is a direct quote from that full-page back-cover Aulani advertisement I picked up in Honolulu:

"Write your own storybook vacations year after year at Aulani, a family paradise with a touch of magic."

Visiting Oahu year after year would be like visiting the Magic Kingdom year after year and never trying Epcot, Hollywood Studios, and Animal Kingdom.

Oahu is a fantastic island and probably the best choice for first-time visitors. But the other islands also offer tremendous opportunities for fun, excitement, exploration, and relaxation. If you decide to return to Hawaii for a second vacation, then you definitely should skip Aulani and travel to Maui, Kauai, or the Big Isle. Here are just a few of the activities I have engaged in on the other islands.

I saw the sunrise from the top of Haleakalā. Then I mounted a bicycle at the top of this 10,023 foot high volcano and rode all the way to the sea (it was almost all downhill so anyone can manage it). It was a great way to spend the day.


Haleakalā

Haleakalā

Haleakalā


I took a helicopter ride on Maui and was treated to a view of one of the most spectacular collections of waterfalls on the islands.


Maui Waterfalls

Maui Waterfalls

Maui Waterfalls

Maui Waterfalls


On Kauai, I took a zodiac rubber raft and sailed inside volcanic lava tubes that opened onto the ocean. This is the area of Hawaii where "Jurassic Park" and "South Pacific" were filmed. The scenery in this part of Kauai is breathtaking.


Zodiac Raft

Zodiac Raft

Zodiac Raft

Zodiac Raft

Zodiac Raft

Zodiac Raft


I've played on black-sand beaches on the Big Isle.


Black Sand Beach

Black Sand Beach


I've taken a helicopter ride over molten lava spewing from Mount Kilauea. I could feel the heat rising as we flew over.


Mount Kilauea

Mount Kilauea

Mount Kilauea

Mount Kilauea


I swam with dolphins and actually got to hug one.


Jack with Dolphin


I've taken a catamaran from Maui to the island of Lanai for a picnic lunch and snorkeling on a nearly deserted beach.


Catamaran to Lanai

Catamaran to Lanai

Catamaran to Lanai


Would I stay at Aulani if I was returning to Hawaii for a week-long vacation? Possibly, if my destination was Oahu. The resort is wonderful if all you want to do is relax by the pool and do little else. As I mentioned yesterday, I've already vacationed on Oahu twice and I've seen most of the major (and many of the minor) attractions here, so laying by a pool for a week is something I would consider. But I'd still have to give it a lot of thought. Aulani is a long way away from everything, including other dining options. I could not eat 21 meals at Aulani over a week's time - even if I had a DVC unit and could cook some of my own meals.

But in all probability, I would not return to Oahu, but rather Maui for a week-long vacation. Many people familiar with Hawaiian vacations prefer Maui. I'd go back to Kāʻanapali and stay at one of the deluxe resorts that line a real beach, not a man-made cove. At Kāʻanapali it's possible to walk along the seashore to about a dozen other resorts and sample their restaurants and shops. In addition, the quaint Whalers Village Shopping Center is smack dab in the middle of it all.


Kāʻanapali

Kāʻanapali


In closing, I would like to ask you to do the following before you start planning your first trip to Hawaii. Ask yourself why you want to travel to the islands. Is it simply because Disney has built a new resort here? I hope it is more than that. Hawaii has so much more to offer than Disney.

Put your prejudice in favor of Disney aside. Don't let Disney decide for you. Ask yourself what you really want to see and do while on Oahu. Then use the internet and/or a travel agent familiar with Hawaii to determine what the right resort for you really is. Do your homework. Read a few tour books. If it turns out you decide to stay at Aulani, fantastic. I know you'll love it. But you might find that other resorts are also fantastic and fill your needs better.

Whatever you decide, a Hawaiian vacation can be incredible. And if you're like most people, you'll fall in love with the islands and want to return again and again.


February 24, 2014

Aulani - Part One

Jack Spence Masthead


Before I made my first trip to Hawaii, I asked my friends who had already visited for some advice. I received the same words of wisdom from them all. "Do not let a travel agent or tour operator talk you into visiting two or three islands in one week's time. Each island has more than enough activities to fill an entire vacation and traveling from one island to another can eat up the better part of a day." I took their advice and I am glad I did. While I lived in Los Angeles and San Francisco, I made six trips to the islands. I visited Oahu and Maui twice each and Kauai and Hawaii (the Big Isle) once each. Every time for a week.

Last month I visited Hawaii again, but this time on a Princess Cruise roundtrip from San Francisco. After four days of crossing the Pacific, I visited these same four islands again, each for one day - hardly enough time to experience what the 50th State has to offer. But then, I didn't take this vacation to visit Hawaii, I took it to relax and enjoy an extended cruise (15 days). Since I had visited Oahu twice in the past, I decided to use my short time in this port to visit Aulani, a relatively new Disney Vacation Club (DVC). I wanted to see what all the hubbub was about and report back to you in a blog.

Before I get into my review, I need to post a disclaimer. I was only at Aulani for approximately three hours. During this time I did my best to soak up every bit of information I could and take as many pictures as possible. But please be aware, there are probably gaps in my descriptions and possibly errors in my information. Also, I did not visit any of the hotel's guest rooms. If you have questions after reading this article, feel free to ask me. But I'm not sure that I will be your best source of information.

First let me give you some background as to Aulani's location. This DVC property is part of a massive master-planned resort called Ko Olina, which is located about 27 miles northwest of Waikiki Beach. To create Ko Olina, a huge parcel of land was cleared and a marina dredged. In addition, four crescent shaped lagoons were cut into the earth, each with openings out onto the Pacific. Three to four hotels will eventually be built around each of these lagoons. In the first picture below you can see the overall layout of the resort. The second picture shows a close-up of Aulani and its neighbor, J.W. Marriott Ilihani. Aulani opened to the public on August 29, 2011. Its price tag is estimated to be around $800 million. Like the Boardwalk Resort at WDW, Aulani is a combination hotel and DVC (359 hotel rooms and 481 DVC units).


Ko Olina

Ko Olina


I'm sure that many of you want to know if Aulani offers the same atmosphere as the Polynesian Resort at WDW. Absolutely not! Even though they both share a Polynesian theme, it's obvious that the Imagineers tried to create a completely different experience.

Before arriving at Aulani, you can see the massive hotel from the road. This view alone should convince you that this is not the Polynesian.


Aulani from a Distance


As you enter the Ko Olina resort, beautiful volcanic rock waterfalls greet you before you pass by a security booth and guard. I was not stopped or asked for any identification.


Lava Waterfall

Guard Booth


Several signs point the way to Aulani and I easily found the resort's parking garage. The price of parking is $35 a day. However, I was able to have my ticket validated as I spent over $35 at lunch (more about lunch later). It was a short walk from the garage to the porte-cochère. Near the main entrance, cooling fruit flavored water is available for thirsty guests. Take a look at the citrus slices.


Porte-cochère

Fruit Flavored Water


Many hotels in Hawaii have open-air lobbies and Aulani is no exception. Since the weather here is near perfect year-round, there is little need for protection from the elements. But of course, there is always the rogue storm so hidden retractable doors are available when needed.

The lobby is impressive. As you enter, you can see through this room and out to the massive playground the Imagineers have built for your amusement.


Aulani Lobby

Aulani Lobby

Aulani Lobby

Aulani Lobby

Pool Area as seen from the Lobby


One can't help but notice the architectural similarities to Kidani Village at Disney's Animal Kingdom Lodge at WDW.


Kidani Village


In the lobby, tiki gods stand sentinel at ground level while Hawaiian legends are depicted in colorful paintings around the ceiling.


Tiki Gods

Hawaiian Murals


Flanking the lobby to the right and left are massive hallways with impressive ceiling arches.


Lobby Hallway


Off of the right hallway you'll find the concierge desks, the check-in desk, a sitting area, and a children's waiting area.


Front Desk

Lobby Lounge

Children's Waiting Room


The resort's shop, Kālepa's Store, can be found off of the left hallway. This mercantile offers a wide array of Aulani branded merchandise as well as a small selection of the typical souvenirs that we're all familiar with at Disneyland and Walt Disney World.


Kālepa's Store

Kālepa's Store

Kālepa's Store


It's also in the lobby area where you'll encounter your first menehune, a mischievous, troll-like creature native to Hawaii. Menehunes are tricky fellows and have hiding places all over the resort. It's great fun to try and discover some of their more concealed locations. This is Disney's Hawaiian version of finding Hidden Mickeys.


Menehune


Below the lobby is Makahiki. This buffet restaurant is open for breakfast and dinner and offers character dining. While I was there, Minnie and Goofy were making the rounds but I understand Donald, Chip & Dale, and Lilo & Stitch also make appearances at the resort. This eatery offers both indoor and outdoor seating.


Makahiki

Makahiki

Makahiki

Makahiki

Makahiki

Makahiki


As you exit Makahiki, Mickey can be found in a lovely courtyard and is available for pictures. Just like at Disney World and Disneyland, a photographer is on hand to capture the moment. He can use his Disney camera or your own. Although I wandered through the exit accidentally after taking pictures of the restaurant, Mickey was more than willing to pose with me.


Mickey Meet & Greet

Mickey and Jack


Hawaiian-themed works of art can be found throughout the resort, both inside and out.


Hawaiian Works of Art

Hawaiian Works of Art

Hawaiian Works of Art

Hawaiian Works of Art


Here are a few pictures of the hotel's towers where the guest rooms are located.


Aulani Towers

Aulani Towers

Aulani Towers

Aulani Towers


The two tower buildings of Aulani create a horseshoe shape that wrap around the pool area. As with any hotel, some rooms have better views than others. Since everyone who comes to Hawaii wants to see the ocean, it's common for hotels here to have angled openings out onto the balconies to maximize views. Aulani is no exception and used this architectural design on many of its rooms.


Close-up of Balcony


Within this horseshoe, the Imagineers have created a Hawaiian paradise of sights and activities. "Water" is definitely the theme here. Take a look at the koi pond found on the doorsteps of Makahiki restaurant.


Koi Pond

Koi Pond

Koi Pond


Perhaps the most unique feature of Aulani is their 8,200 square foot pool complex. Here you'll find two slides, an artificial snorkeling lagoon, a combination jungle-gym/splash area, and a "lazy river" reminiscent of Typhoon Lagoon and Blizzard Beach (only shorter in length). Here are a few pictures of Waikolohe Stream, the lazy river.


Waikolohe Stream

Waikolohe Stream

Waikolohe Stream

Waikolohe Stream

Waikolohe Stream


When I stumbled across Menehune Bridge, the jungle-gym/splash area, I said out loud "Wow!" This is a magnificent water play area for kids that makes adults envious of their children's youth. I know I wanted to run beneath these pylons and get wet.


Menehune Bridge

Menehune Bridge

Menehune Bridge


Rainbow Reef is where guests can get a taste of snorkeling. An underwater viewing area allows for some great photos of your friends and family.


Rainbow Reef

Rainbow Reef

Rainbow Reef

Rainbow Reef


Rainbow Reef is not free. One-day use is $15 for adults (10 and up) and $10 for children. Length-of-Stay use is $20 for adults and $15 for children.

As nice as Rainbow Reef is, PLEASE, do not go back to the mainland and tell your friends that you went snorkeling in Hawaii if this man-made lagoon is all you've experienced. There are too many real snorkeling adventures available in the islands that are far superior to this Disney offering.

Here are a few pictures of Waikolohe Pool, the family fun pool.


Waikolohe Pool

Waikolohe Pool

Waikolohe Pool


The "infinity" pool makes it look like this body of water goes on and on forever and connects with the Pacific Ocean. But this is just an optical illusion. The fresh water and sea water are actually quite a distance apart.


Infinity Pool

Infinity Pool


The Ka Maka Grotto is another jaw-dropping feat of engineering. The Imagineers did a fantastic job of making a man-made structure look natural and oh so inviting.


Ka Maka Grotto

Ka Maka Grotto


Tucked away in the corner of this massive swim area is an adult's only pool and bar. Although nice, compared to the other pools, it lacks imagination.


Adult Pool

Adult Pool


At the other end of the age-scale is a splash area designed especially for toddlers. The kids I saw here were having a great time.


Toddler Pool


There are a few poolside cabanas that can be rented for your own private group.


Cabanas


Located around the pool are a number of food stands and bars where you can grab a quick bite to eat or drink. One of the more interesting of these is The Lava Shack. This establishment is tucked into the man-made volcanic mountain and is themed to be a Hawaiian surf shop of the 1930's.


The Lava Shack

The Lava Shack

The Lava Shack


If you want more than just a snack, check out Ulu Café. This spot offers a wide variety of food options and features a grill where you can order a hot breakfast or lunch. You can opt to eat at tables near the restaurant or take your food back to your lounge chair. Ulu Cafe is comparable in concept to Captain Cook's at the Polynesian at WDW.


Ulu Café

Ulu Café

Ulu Café


Since I wasn't an actual guest of Aulani, I wasn't sure if I would be allowed onto the property. To insure that I could check things out legitimately, I made advance reservations to eat lunch at 'AMA 'AMA, the resort's fine dining establishment. As it turns out, Disney doesn't care who stops by, just as long as you can afford the $35 parking fee.

'AMA 'AMA is a beautiful, open-air restaurant. Tables on the lanai are afforded a stunning view of the lagoon in the foreground and the Pacific Ocean in the background. 'AMA 'AMA serves both lunch and dinner.


'AMA 'AMA

'AMA 'AMA

'AMA 'AMA

'AMA 'AMA


I mentioned menehunes earlier. It seems that two of these little trolls have hiding spots in the 'AMA 'AMA rafters. I have to be honest, I had the hostess help me find them.


Menehune

Menehune


For lunch I had a pulled-pork sandwich which was served on a special Hawaiian bread. Each of the three mini-sandwiches offered a different, distinctive flavor. My friend Donald had a Caesar Salad with grilled shrimp. We were both more than pleased with our selections.


Pulled Pork Sandwich

Caesar Salad with grilled shrimp


For dessert we shared a pineapple crème brûlée. Although it was attractive to look at and large enough for two, we were both disappointed with the flavor and the fact that it didn't have a caramelized topping. Overall, it was pretty bland.


crème brûlée


By the way, if you think prices are high at WDW, they're just as high if not higher in Hawaii. A note to Disneyland and Walt Disney World cast members, bring your cast ID, you get a discount here.

First time visitors to Hawaii are often struck by the large amount of Japanese tourists they encounter here. As it turns out, the islands are a major vacation destination for our Asian friends. In fact, many signs and advertisements in the islands are written in both English and Japanese. I understand that rice cookers are a standard kitchen appliance in the DVC units at Aulani.

Next door to Aulani is a beautiful wedding chapel (not run by Disney). While enjoying lunch, I spotted Japanese newlyweds on the beach, posing for pictures. I was so struck by the romance of the moment, I just had to snap a few pictures. I used my telephoto lens as to not intrude.


Japanese Couple


Also while enjoying lunch, I got to watch the Navy conduct exercises from nearby Pearl Harbor. This ship passed by several times during my visit.


Naval Ship


Near 'AMA 'AMA is a large fire pit where Hawaiian tales are told in the evening.


Fire Pit


The white-sand cove is shared by all of the resorts that line its boarders. Currently, this is just Aulani and the J.W. Marriott Ilihani. A resort room key is needed to open a gate for reentrance back onto Aulani grounds from the cove. Fortunately for me, this security measure was not working on the day I visited. This allowed me to enter the beach area and take pictures without getting trapped out there.


Beach Cove

Beach Cove


A long grassy area separates a meandering walkway from the sugar-sand beach. Wooden lounge chairs are available for sunning.


Beach Cove

Beach Cove


A Beach Rentals shop is nearby for guest who wish to rent a variety of flotation devices and surfboard-type craft.


Beach Rentals

Beach Rentals

Beach Rentals

Beach Rentals


Several floating "islands" are anchored a short distance from the shore for additional fun.


Floating Island


The wave action in the crescent lagoon is minimal. This is a very calm body of water.

Pay attention to what I have to say next. You cannot access the ocean from this cove. A warning rope blocks your path. And even if you could get to the ocean, you would find the jagged volcanic rocks more than you would want to contend with. So if it's your dream to frolic in the waves, surf, or bodysurf in Hawaii from your resort's doorstep, Aulani is not a good choice.


Cove Opening onto the Ocean


(Note, I photoshopped the above picture by adding additional buoys. I wanted to accentuate the cove boundary as the rope was not obvious in the picture. However, the line that I have created here is accurate.)

Also found in the cove area are a number of stone markers. These contain the names of the original Aulani DVC members. A similar recognition can be found at Bay Lake Tower at WDW.


Aulani DVC Recognition

Aulani DVC Recognition

Bay Lake Tower DVC Recognition

Bay Lake Tower DVC Recognition


As with all DVC's, Aulani features a Community Hall. Known as the Pau Hana Room, this spot offers an abundance of activities for DVC members. Some of these include hula lessons and beginner Hawaiian language classes.


Pau Hana Room


Here is what an Aulani cast member name tag looks like. I found it interesting that it is the same shape and size as a WDW name tag, but has an entirely different look and feel.


Aulani Cast Member Name Tag


Aulani is a beautiful hotel. It's obvious that Joe Rohde and his team of Imagineers wanted to create an all-inclusive destination resort and they pulled out all the stops to do so. Only the most jaded of persons would not be impressed on some level with their efforts. Click here for the official Aulani webpage.

That's it for Part One of my Aulani overview. Check back tomorrow when I'll answer the $64,000 question, "Would I recommend Aulani?" My answer might surprise you.



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