« June 2010 | Main | August 2010 »

July 2010 Archives

July 1, 2010

Splash Mountain Part Two

We all know that Song of the South and Splash Mountain were based on the characters of Joel Chandler Harris. But most of us don't know the background story that the Imagineers gave this fabled mountain.

Legend has it that deep in the "New-nited States of Georgia," live critters that walk and talk in the same manner as human folk. At the center of this magical land is Chick-A-Pin Hill and it's here that the Beaver Brothers had built their sturdy new dam. But unbeknownst to them, Rackety Raccoon had also constructed a juice producing still in the same area. And it seems that while Rackety was concocting a new, experimental brew, he used a few too many blueberries with disastrous results. When his still exploded, it took the Beaver Brothers' dam with it and water began to rush downhill and through the many caves, burrows, holes, and tunnels that crisscrossed the mountain. From that moment on, the local critters started calling their home Splash Mountain and the name stuck.

The lighthearted mood of the attraction is set near the entrance. Here we see a statue of the not-so-bright Br'er Fox and Br'er Bear looking for Br'er Rabbit who is hiding from them in plain sight atop Br'er Bear's club. Under the train trestle are the FastPass machines. These were once crates used to haul cargo on the nearby railroad. Also in this area is one of Br'er Rabbit's Laughing Places intended for critters under 40 inches tall.


Statue of of Brer Rabbit, Brer Fox, and Brer Bear

Splash Mountain FastPass Machine

Laughing Place for Children


The story of Splash Mountain is set in the Deep South shortly after the American Civil War. The background music heard in the outdoor queue sets the mood for this bygone era by playing tunes such as "Polly Wolly Doodle" and "Froggy Comes A'Courtin'." These songs are played on era appropriate instruments like the harmonica, banjo, and mouth harp, all of which were popular in the 19th century. Much of the outdoor queue winds through a wooded area inhabited by many of the local critters. A number of their homes can be seen as you wander about.

Critter Home in Outdoor Queue


The entrance to Splash Mountain is through an old barn used by the critters. Tacked onto the door is the front page of the critter's local newspaper, the Rabbit Tales, sounding a warning. Many farm implements can be found inside the barn, but it's obvious that the main purpose for this structure is to grind wheat and grain into flour. Also, once inside, the music changes to the tunes heard in the Song of the South movie.


Splash Mountain Entrance

Rabbit Tales Newspaper

Barn Interior


In Tall Tale Tunnel we discover clues about the adventure we're about to experience. Here we see a sampler with a wise message and portraits of some of the characters we're about to meet. This is also where we're introduced to Br'er Frog. Here we see his shadow cast against his cave home, spinning bodacious yarns about Br'er Rabbit.


Sampler

Picture of Brer Rabbit

Brer Frog


The main transportation in and around Splash Mountain is via logs, hollowed out by sharp toothed beavers. Our journey begins as we leave the loading dock and make a sudden right turn and begin a climb up a sharp incline. Along the way we see Br'er Frog again, this time in the flesh, lamenting that Br'er Rabbit is in for trouble if he doesn't mend his ways.


Brer Frog


At the top of the incline we sail past Br'er Rabbit's home in the briar patch and head toward the Log Lifter. The Log Lifter is an ingenious device created by the Beaver Brothers to haul logs to the top of Chick-A-Pin Hill. It's also near the entrance to the Log Lifter that folks may get wet. In fact, if the timing is right, you'll get wetter here than on the big plunge later on. You see, as the logs slide down Chick-A-Pin Hill they create a tremendous splash that aims right for the Log Lifter.


Briar Patch

Log Lifter


At the top of this next incline we find a number of indications that critters inhabit the mountain. First we happen upon a charlatan's wagon selling Critter Elixir. This potent brew guarantees to cure fleas, flat feet, and fur balls. Next is a small garden tended to by some unseen creature. Carrots, turnips, lettuce and cabbage are all ripe for the picking. Further on we find a still, presumably not Rackety Raccoon's which blew up earlier. Also dotting the landscape are numerous critter homes.


Critter Elixir

Critter Garden

Muskrat Still

Critter Homes

Critter Homes


Around the next bend we discover the home of Br'er Bear, and just beyond, Slippin' Falls. It's here that our log takes a sudden dip and enters the interior of Splash Mountain and we come face to face with the critters themselves.


Brer Bear's House

Slippin' Falls


Inside the cave we're greeted by a number of geese and frogs, welcoming us to their home with a lively rendition of "How Do You Do?" Disney Legend Thurl Ravenscroft, who voice characters in the Haunted Mansion and Pirates of the Caribbean (among others), lends his voice to one of the croakers.


Singing Frog

Singing Geese


In the next scene we see Br'er Fox and Br'er Bear eavesdropping on Br'er Rabbit as he tells Mr. Bluebird he's packing up his things and leaving his troubles behind in the briar patch. The nefarious duo start to plot just how they will capture this happy-go-lucky fellow.


Brer Fox and Brer Bear

Brer Rabbit and Mr. Bluebird


As we travel deeper into Splash Mountain, we come across Br'er Raccoon and Br'er Porkypine. They, along with the Baby Bunny twins try to warn Br'er Rabbit that while looking for new adventures he might find new troubles. In the distant background we see Br'er Fox and Br'er Bear chasing after Br'er Rabbit.


Br'er Raccoon and Br'er Porkypine

Baby Bunny


In an effort to snare Br'er Rabbit, Br'er Fox sets a trap. But the dim-witted Br'er Bear stumbles into it and is caught instead, infuriating his short-tempered cohort. Safe on the other side of the river, Br'er Rabbit laughs and taunts the two and tells them he has a special "laughing place" that only he knows about.


Brer Bear Caught in a Trap

Brer Rabbit Escapes


We run into Br'er Frog again, enjoying the Old Swimming Hole with his friend Br'er Gator. Beyond their fishin' spot are a number of critter homes and we can hear several of the inhabitants singing about Br'er Rabbit's laughing place.


Brer Frog and Brer Gator

Critter Homes


For you trivia buffs, the three possums hanging overhead in this area are named Pansy, Poppy, and Petunia.


Pansy, Poppy, and Petunia


Br'er Rabbit paints a sign saying, "To the Laughing Place" on an old tree branch. Believing what he reads, the doltish Br'er Bear plunges head first into an opening and stirs up a hive of bees. Moments later, a loud crack can be heard as the rotting tree trunk gives way and they fall into a cave below, taking us along with them.


Looking for the Laughing Place


At the beginning of our adventure, the colors used in the attraction are bright and well saturated. But when we fall into the cave the colors become darker, signifying danger ahead for Br'er Rabbit and us.

As we enter the cave, we see a number of beehives hanging from the ceiling and their angry inhabitants buzzing around. Further on we find Br'er Bear has landed on his back and has a beehive stuck on his nose. Br'er Rabbit is also on his back, laughing hysterically. He says to Br'er Bear, "I didn't say this was you're laughing place. I said it was MY laughing place." But unbeknownst to Br'er Rabbit, Br'er Fox has snuck up behind him with a "beehive honey-trap surprise" of his own.


Brer Bear and the Bees

Brer Rabbit about to be Caught


It turns out that Br'er Rabbit's laughing place is actually a flooded mine that is enjoyed by a number of critters. As we pass through this area, we see several of his friends having a rollicking good time.

A note of clarification. Many people think that the weasel that pokes his head out from the ceiling is saying "FSU" (Florida State University) as an inside joke the Imagineers added to the attraction. This is not true. The weasel is sneezing and says "Ah ah choo!"


Critter Friends

Gopher


Further into the cave we discover that Br'er Fox has finally succeeded in capturing Br'er Rabbit. He has encased our frightened hero in a beehive he secured earlier.


Captured Brer Rabbit


As we start our ascent out of the cave two buzzards pontificate on the sad fate about to befall Br'er Rabbit. Along the rocky walls, strange eyes peer out from the darkness.


Vultures


Near the top of the mine shaft we find Br'er Fox's lair and Br'er Rabbit tied to a spit, waiting to be roasted. In the background we hear Br'er Fox taunting him with a variety of threats. But the quick thinking Br'er Rabbit responds, "That's okay Br'er Fox. Hangs me if you gotta. But please, PLEASE don't fling me into that briar patch." Once again, the feebleminded Br'er Bear doesn't realize that he's being tricked and does just that -tosses Br'er Rabbit into the briar patch and the safety of his home. Of course, all of us in the log come along for the ride.


Brer Fox's Lair


Realizing the error of his ways, Br'er Rabbit decides that home is the best place to be and his Splash Mountain friends all welcome him back with a rousing rendition of Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah. We also find that Br'er Bear never learns and has become entangled in the briar patch while looking for Br'er Rabbit. While Br'er Fox tries to disengage him from the thorns, Br'er Gator has chomped onto his tale.


Showboat

Brer Bear Caught in the Briar Patch


In the last scene we find Br'er Rabbit comfortably back at his house with his friend Mr. Bluebird. The two of them sing of their good fortune.


Brer Rabbit Back Home


Like many other Disney attractions, your picture is taken on Splash Mountain. Be ready to smile as you careen over the top of Chick-A-Pin Hill. These photos are sold in the shop that you exit through after the ride. In addition, Disney has created two excellent spots for capturing friends and family as they plunge into the briar patch.


Photo Purchasing

Splash Down

Splash Down


The plunge down Chick-A-Pin Hill is 52 ½ feet long on a 45 degree incline. Guests descend at a speed of approximately 40 miles per hour. The ride is approximately eleven minutes in duration. Riders must be at least 40 inches tall to ride. Expectant mothers and those with health problems should avoid this attraction.

I have created a video of this wonderful attraction from start to finish. For those of you who haven't yet worked up the courage to ride, this is a great way to experience Splash Mountain. Enjoy.




July 6, 2010

Port Orleans French Quarter - Part One

French Quarter Sign.jpg


I recently wrote an article about Port Orleans - Riverside. Today I'm going to discuss its sister resort, Port Orleans - French Quarter.

In the beginning, the French Quarter was known only as Port Orleans. It did not become Port Orleans - French Quarter until it merged with nearby Dixie Landings in the spring of 2001. From this point on, I will refer to this resort only as French Quarter.

The theme of Disney's French Quarter is Laissez les bons temps rouler! or Let the good times roll. This resort takes its inspiration from the Jackson Square warehouse district of New Orleans in which Spanish and French colonialism played a part in its culture and design. This six-by-thirteen block area of New Orleans is famous for its balconies, wrought-iron railings, cobblestone streets, and courtyards. In this Florida recreation, it feels like Mardi Gras everyday yet tranquility can be found around each corner. Celebration and romance go hand-in-hand at the French Quarter.

Your stay begins under an elaborate, wrought-iron portico. Here, a lively greeter may welcome you to the resort with festive beads and commemorative coins. Nearby is the resort's one and only bus stop. Transportation to the theme parks and water parks leave from this location approximately every 15-20 minutes.


Portica

Bus Stop


Inside the lobby of The Mint Building is a lovely fountain. A number of the resort's facilities radiate from this location. Our first stop is the Registration Desk. This area was themed after the inside of a commercial bank of the 1800s. The mural along the back wall displays the festivities of Mardi Gras. And the railing that lines the desk is a musical staff, complete with notes that represent the first verse of a tune synonymous with New Orleans, "When the Saints Go Marching In."

Lobby and Fountain

Registration Desk

Musical Staff


Check-in time is 3pm, however, if you arrive early, Bell Services can store your luggage until your room is ready. In addition, if you give the reservation clerk a cell phone number, you will be called when you're room is ready. Check-out time is 11am.

The backstory for The Mint Building goes something like this. Port Orleans was originally under the rule of the French, but was later transferred to Spanish ownership as war debt. When this happened, the French franc became worthless in this far off territory as the Spanish peseta was now the legal tender of the land. This brought commerce to a screeching halt. Realizing that something needed to be done, the new Spanish governor built a mint and granted an equal exchange of currency to all residents. In no time at all, trade began again and Port Orleans continued to prosper. When the Spanish territory was transferred back to the French in later years, the city was able to easily cope as The Mint was able to change its engraving plates and switched to the franc.

When Port Orleans began to celebrate Mardi Gras, The Mint began producing commemorative coins, which became an immediate hit. Both the local residents and visitors to the area valued these coins as keepsakes and a remembrance of the festive event.

Eventually the Louisiana Territory was sold to the United States in 1803. When this happened, The Mint became obsolete as a producer of currency. However, the Bank of Port Orleans remained successful and a necessary part of the city's growth. Samuel and Mary Chatelaine, the great grandchildren of The Mint's founder, bought the bank in 1886. They renamed it the Port Orleans Mint and continued the production of commemorative coins which are still given out to guests this very day. .


Commemorative Coins


Across the way from the Registration Desk is the Concierge Desk. Here, helpful cast members can sell you tickets to the theme parks and water parks, make dining reservations, and secure Cirque du Soleil La Nouba tickets. In addition, they can answer just about any Disney question you may have.


Concierge Desk


Also in this area is a great place for the kids to wait while mom and dad check in. Disney cartoons are played on the television and crayons and coloring sheets are available for the budding artist.


Children's Area


Adjoining the "bank" building is Jackson Square Gifts. This shop has two entrances, one off of the lobby and one onto The Courtyard. Open daily from 8am to 11pm, this emporium sells Disney souvenirs, snacks, newspapers, magazines, sundries, infant needs, and postage stamps. In addition there are a few items specifically themed to the French Quarter.


Jackson Square Gifts

Jackson Square Gifts

Jackson Square Gifts


Next to Jackson Square Gifts is South Quarter Games. This electronic paradise features a wide variety of games for those of you with good eye-to-hand coordination. Don't worry, a change machine is on hand to convert those pesky paper bills into coin.


South Quarter Games

South Quarter Games

South Quarter Games


On the other side of the lobby is Scat Cat's Club. This cozy lounge is full of memorabilia of some of jazz's greatest musicians. Open daily from 4pm until midnight, this is the perfect spot to unwind with a cocktail or specialty drink after a long day in the parks. Live entertainment is featured Wednesday through Saturday.


Scat Cat's Club

Scat Cat's Club


Hungry? Then head for Sassagoula Floatworks & Food Factory. This building is themed to look like a warehouse where props are stored and floats are constructed for Mardi Gras. Some of this paraphernalia was created by Blain Kern Artists, Inc. and others were actually purchased from warehouses in New Orleans. Just in case you're not sure, Mardi Gras ("Fat Tuesday") is the celebration that signals the beginning of the Lenten season. In New Orleans, the holiday is marked with parades, floats, masks, beads and the resort's motto Laissez les bons temps rouler! or Let the good times roll.

This counter-service restaurant is large and can seat 300 people. Breakfast can be particularly busy. If you want to avoid this daily crush of people, try and arrive before 8am. You might also want to grab some prepackaged goodies and drinks the night before and store them in your in-room refrigerator. To see the complete menu, click here (breakfast - lunch/dinner). Baked to order pizza for room delivery is available from 4pm to midnight.

Here are the restaurant's hours:

Bakery: 6am - Midnight
Breakfast: 6:00am - 11:30am
Lunch: 11:30am - 5:00pm
Dinner: 5:00pm - 10:00pm


Then head for Sassagoula Floatworks & Food Factory

Then head for Sassagoula Floatworks & Food Factory

Then head for Sassagoula Floatworks & Food Factory

Then head for Sassagoula Floatworks & Food Factory


I have eaten at the Sassagoula Floatworks & Food Factory a number of times. I've always been pleased with my meal, but I find some of the overhead masks and props a little creepy. So for me, if the weather is nice, I much prefer to eat at one of the outside tables in and around The Courtyard.


Outdoor Seating

Outdoor Seating

The Courtyard


That's it for Part One. Check back tomorrow for Part Two.



July 7, 2010

Port Orleans French Quarter - Part Two

Thanks for checking back for Part Two of my French Quarter blog.

Leading from The Courtyard to Doubloon Lagoon (the swimming pool area), is a rather unique walkway. Here you'll find a number of jazz-playing gators to liven things up. This is also an irresistible picture spot. Here's a shot of a much-younger me on my first stay at the French Quarter followed by a similar shot taken recently. Notice how the length of my shorts has changed.


Gator Alley

Jack and a Gator

Jack and a Gator


Flanking this walkway is a children's playground (ages 2 -12) and hot tub (open 7am to midnight).


Children's Playground

Hot Tub


Further along the walkway is Mardi Grogs Pool Bar (I just love this pun). Open 11:30am until dusk, this spot serves alcoholic concoctions, soft drinks, and snacks.


Mardi Grogs Pool Bar

Mardi Grogs Pool Bar


The harlequin character that guards the swimming pool is based on a similar figure found next to Canal Street and the Algiers Ferry Terminal in New Orleans.


Harlequin Character


The pool area at the French Quarter is called Doubloon Lagoon. The centerpiece for this oasis is "Scales" a huge sea serpent that snakes its way in and around the deck. Legend has it that when the French Quarter was in its infancy, folks created a makeshift serpent to frighten children away from the dangerous bayou. Eventually, this creature became a part of the Mardi Gras celebration and ultimately, a permanent fixture of the French Quarter. Today, kids enter Scales and slide down his tongue for a splash landing. Atop Scales is King Neptune, keeping a watchful eye on those below. And more jazz-loving gators can be found nearby.


Scales

Scales

Doubloon Lagoon


Gator Band

Gator with Horn


Adjacent to the main pool is a children's wading pool, but there are no secondary, "quiet" pools at the French Quarter. However, guests may also use any of the pools at Disney's Riverside Resort located a short walk up the Sassagoula River. Towels are available at Doubloon Lagoon; however, you'll need to take your room towels with you when using other pools. You can call Housekeeping to replenish the towel supply in your room.


Children's Pool

Gator with Sax


Also near the pool is the one and only self-service laundry facility. "Laundry on the Levee" features a large number of washers and dryers in air conditioned comfort. Vending machines offer soap, bleach, beverages, and change. If you must wash clothes while on vacation, this is a good spot as you can easily enjoy the pool while taking care of this otherwise boring task. Dry cleaning and laundry service is also available for pickup from your room.


Laundry on the Levee

Laundry on the Levee


The French Quarter opened on May 17, 1991 with 432 rooms in three guest buildings. In the months to come, the resort was expanded to seven buildings and a total of 1,008 rooms. Of these, 946 rooms have 2 double beds and 62 rooms have a king-size bed (with a higher room rate). There are also 12 disabled-accessible rooms. The typical room is 314 square feet. Each building contains 144 rooms and is clearly identified with a number and a musical instrument associated with jazz music.


Building Numbers

Building Numbers


Although the seven buildings are quite large, the clever use of color, different styles of wrought iron, brickwork, rooflines, and angles create the look of row houses in New Orleans rather than large, institutional structures. Lush landscaping and cobblestone "streets" add to the effect and make guests believe they're wandering in a bygone neighborhood rather than a modern resort.


French Quarter Exterior Buildings

French Quarter Exterior Buildings

French Quarter Exterior Buildings

French Quarter Street

French Quarter Street


To help you find your way around, the streets have been given some imaginative names that are sure to make you smile.


Sign Posts

Sign Posts

Sign Posts


Between many of the buildings are manicured courtyards complete with fountains. Note, most of these areas are designated smoking sections so those of you with an aversion, plan accordingly.


Fountain and Courtyard

Fountain and Courtyard

Fountain and Courtyard

Courtyard


Basic rooms contain the following:

Two double beds or one king
Chest of drawers
A table and two chairs
Vanity area with two sinks - curtain divide from bedroom
Private shower/tub & toilet area
Clock-radio-alarm
Cable TV with Disney programming
High-speed Internet Access (for an additional fee)
Hairdryer
Safe
Iron and Ironing Board
Coffee Maker
Refrigerator

For guests with disabilities, wheelchair-accessible bathrooms and rooms designed for the hearing impaired are available (not shown). Elevators and snack and beverage machines can also be found in each building.


Table and Chairs

Chest of Drawers and TV

Beds

Vanity

Toilet and Shower


Finding the right spot to park your car is a breeze. Large, easy-to-read signs mark each lot and none are too far away from your room. Note, staying at a Disney Resort entitles you to complimentary parking at the theme parks.


Parking Indicator Signs


For me, one of the most delightful activities at Walt Disney World is a boat ride on the Sassagoula River. Flat-bottom craft make their way between the French Quarter, Riverside, and Downtown Disney. Service begins each day at 10am with pickups every 20 minutes. Starting at 4:30pm, the interval is 10 minutes until the end of service at 11pm. Bus service to the resort is available from 11pm to 2am.


Sassagoula River Boat


I like the French Quarter. I feel it is more compact than the Riverside, thus, easier to navigate. However, it might not be perfect for everyone. A number of facilities and amenities are only available at the Riverside Resort next door. Although Disney touts this as an easy journey, it isn't necessarily so. Depending on your room location, the walk can be anywhere from 10 to 15 minutes (in the heat or rain). And waiting for the boat can be just as long if not longer. Here are a few of the services found only at the Riverside:

Boatwright's - a full service restaurant
Fishing hole and fishing excursions
Boat rentals
Bicycle rentals
Horse-drawn carriage rides
Quiet pools

Now if you don't plan on using any of these services, then I think you should definitely consider a stay at the French Quarter. As I said at the beginning of this article, Disney has done a wonderful job of combining festivity with relaxation. Charm oozes from every nook and cranny and your senses are in for a treat. It's hard to believe the French Quarter is a moderate resort. It has an allure worthy of a deluxe facility.

I have created a 10 minute video that highlights most of the resort. For those of you who are curious, the songs played are:

Down in New Orleans (from the Princess and the Frog)
Swanee River (Disneyland's Royal Street Bachelors)
Happy Rag (Disneyland's Royal Street Bachelors)
My Grandfather's Clock

Enjoy.




July 18, 2010

It’s Disney Theme Park Quiz Time - Questions

It's time to pull out your thinking caps again. I have another Disney quiz for you. This time, you have to name at which of the eleven Disney Parks the picture was taken. Now I realize that most of you have not been to all of the parks around the world, so I'm going to try and make this quiz as easy as I can. In all cases, I have taken either an iconic picture or a shot that can only be taken in one, specific park. For example, I would NOT take a picture of New Orleans Square and expect you to figure out if it's at Disneyland or Tokyo Disneyland.

Here is a list of the eleven parks:

Disneyland
Disney's California Adventure
Magic Kingdom
Epcot
Disney's Hollywood Studios
Disney's Animal Kingdom
Tokyo Disneyland
Tokyo DisneySea
Disneyland Paris
Walt Disney Studios Paris
Hong Kong Disneyland

I have included three shots from each park for a total of 33 pictures. You can use this information to help narrow down your search.

For an added challenge, you might try to name the "land" or "area" of the park the picture was taken.

Do not send me your answers. This quiz is for your enjoyment only. I will post the answers tomorrow. Good luck.


Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World



Disney Around the World


July 19, 2010

It's Disney Theme Parks Quiz Time -- Answers

Here are the answers to yesterday's quiz. I hope you got them all right.



This first picture was taken at Hong Kong Disneyland. This fountain is outside of the park in a "crossroads" location. Guests arriving by bus, train, and walking from the hotels meet at this location before entering Hong Kong Disneyland. Long term plans include a second park that will also radiate off from this fountain.


Hong Kong Disneyland



This picture was taken in Fantasyland at the Magic Kingdom. It is of the old Skyway terminal that closed on November 9, 1999.


Magic Kingdom



The Bountiful Valley Farm building houses "It's Tough to be a Bug" at Disney's California Adventure. It is located in "a bugs land."


Disney's California Adventure



Walt Disney Studios Paris is where you'll find this recreation of the Partners Statue. This picture looks into the Production Courtyard section of the park.


Walt Disney Studios Paris



Picture Number 5 was taken at Tokyo DisneySea. We're in Mediterranean Harbor looking at Fortress Explorations and Mount Prometheus.


Tokyo DisneySea



The Columbia Sailing Ship is unique to Disneyland. This full sized recreation of the first American ship to circumnavigate the globe was christened on June 4, 1958 and follows the same 12 minute journey as its sister ship, the Mark Twain.


Disneyland



Picture 7 was taken at Epcot between Innoventions East and West. Beneath this awning is a Tip Board, Information Desk, and Pin Trading Station.


Epcot



Here we are at Disney's Animal Kingdom in Chester and Hester's DinoRama. Typical of the era depicted in this land, "novelty architecture" was brought into play with the creation of a large yellow dinosaur (concreteasaurus) to entice tourist to the area.


Disney's Animal Kingdom



"Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage" can be experienced in Tomorrowland at Disneyland. The original attraction was sponsored by General Dynamics and opened in 1959. It closed almost 39 years later on September 9, 1998. The attraction was dormant until a cute little clown fish brought new life to this tired ride and it reopened on June 11, 2007.


Disneyland



Across from Disneyland we find ourselves at Disney's California Adventure in the Golden State area looking up at the park's icon, Grizzly Peak. Rising 100 feet, this landmark can be seen from many vantage points around the park.


Disney's California Adventure



This next picture was taken at Tokyo Disneyland in Tomorrowland. The building houses Star Tours and the second-story walkway takes exiting guest to the Pan Galactic Pizza Port.


Tokyo Disneyland



At Disney's Hollywood Studios in the Echo Lake district we find Dinosaur Gertie's Ice Cream of Extinction. This "California Crazy" architecture pays tribute to "Gertie the Dinosaur," one of the first animated stars of note.


Disney's Hollywood Studios



This quiet courtyard can be found in the United Kingdom Pavilion at Epcot. Eight different architectural styles were used in this pavilion. Among them, Tudor, Georgian, and Victorian.


Epcot



In Liberty Square at the Magic Kingdom we find the Liberty Bell. Cast from the same mold as the original, this bell was created for the Walt Disney World Resort in 1989. Circling the bell are the flags of the original thirteen colonies. Near the base of each flagpole is a brass plate with the date that the state ratified the Constitution.


Magic Kingdom



The castles at Disneyland and Hong Kong Disneyland are almost identical. But it's easy to tell them apart. Hong Kong Disneyland is the only park to be situated up against rolling hills, giving this park a distinctive backdrop.


Hong Kong Disneyland



In Fantasyland at Disneyland, we find Monstro the Whale swallowing boats on their way to Storybook Land. This attraction takes guests by miniature homes of some of Disney's most beloved classics. All of the boats on this attraction are named after female Disney characters except for Flower, the male skunk from Bambi.


Disneyland



In Tomorrowland at Disneyland Paris, we find the airship Hyperion. For you movie buffs, Disney released a film in 1974 titled "The Island at the Top of the World." The movie starred Donald Sinden as Sir Anthony Ross who hires Professor Ivarsson, played by David Hartman, to help him locate his missing son somewhere in the arctic. The airship Hyperion was their means of transportation to this remote area. A counter-service restaurant is located inside this building.


Disneyland Paris



This soundstage can be found at Walt Disney Studios Paris in the Toon Studio area. Showing in this theater is "Animagique" where puppets and "live" Disney characters tell a story similar to Mickey's Philharmagic.


Walt Disney Studios Paris



Also in Toon Studio at Walt Disney Studios Paris is "Cars Quatre Roues Rallye." Set in the small town of Radiator Springs, this attraction is themed to look like a gas/service station of years past. Similar to the Tea Cup rides in the Magic Kingdom-type parks, guests spin around while traveling in a figure-eight pattern, narrowly missing other cars.


Walt Disney Studios Paris



World Bazaar at Tokyo Disneyland is the only Main Street to be covered.


Tokyo Disneyland



This next picture was taken in the Africa section of Disney's Animal Kingdom. The buildings here contain Tusker House, a buffet-style restaurant.


Disney's Animal Kingdom



One of my favorite spots at Epcot, and probably a favorite of many of you, is the Boulangerie Patisserie located in the France Pavilion. What better place is there to indulge in such decadence?


Epcot



Years before Los Angeles was famous for its freeways, it boasted the largest mass transit system in the world, the Pacific Electric Railway. Locals affectionately called the trolleys either the P.E. or the Big Red Car. The system spanned southern California with over 1,100 miles a track that ran between Riverside, San Bernardino, Orange, and Los Angeles Counties.

These vestiges from the past are fondly remembered on Sunset Boulevard at Disney's Hollywood Studios.

Disney's Hollywood Studios



The Starliner Diner is a counter service restaurant found in Tomorrowland at Hong Kong Disneyland. Unlike other Tomorrowlands around the world, this land takes on a "toy" quality that is enduring and charming.


Hong Kong Disneyland



Here we are in Fantasyland, Disneyland Paris. When the Imagineers began their plans for Sleeping Beauty Castle, they were keenly aware that the surrounding countryside was full of "genuine" castles. They realized that Europeans could easily be blasé with their design unless they came up with something truly magical. And that they did. Paris' Sleeping Beauty Castle is arguably the most beautiful of any of the Disney structures. It's absolutely stunning and can transform even the most cynical adult back to childhood.


Disneyland Paris



Phantom Manor (The Haunted Mansion) is located in Frontierland at Disneyland Paris. Similar versions of this attraction appear in New Orleans Square at Disneyland, Liberty Square at the Magic Kingdom, and Fantasyland at Tokyo Disneyland. And the latest version of this attraction is being built in a new land called Mystic Point at Hong Kong Disneyland.


Disneyland Paris



The Western River Railroad is unique among its steam train cousins in the other Disney parks in that it doesn't circle the perimeter of Tokyo Disneyland. You see, if it did, its track length combined with multiple stations would have classified it as "public transportation" under Japanese law and it would have fallen under government jurisdiction. This of course was unacceptable to Disney and some other solution needed to be reached. And that solution was a railroad that runs only through Adventureland and Frontierland and only has one station.


Tokyo Disneyland



One of the most recent additions to Tokyo DisneySea is the Tower of Terror. Located in the American Waterfront section of the park, this tower varies in several ways from its cousins in other Disney parks. In Paris and California, the exterior of the buildings have a Spanish motif while in Florida the building has a Moroccan flavor. The Tower in Tokyo is built of red brick and has a gothic feel. Another change to the Tokyo attraction was necessitated because the Japanese are not familiar with the Twilight Zone television series. To remedy this, the Imagineers came up with a completely new storyline.


Tokyo DisneySea



Taste Pilot's Grill is located in the Golden State section of Disney's California Adventure. This restaurant pays homage to the brave individuals that tested early aircraft and eventually, broke the sound barrier.


Disney's California Adventure



This pyramid is located in the Lost River Delta section of Tokyo DisneySea. Within its chambers is the "Indiana Jones Adventure: Temple of the Crystal Skull" attraction. This ride is very similar to the "Temple of the Forbidden Eye" attraction at Disneyland.


Tokyo DisneySea



Back in Adventureland at the Magic Kingdom, we find Pirates of the Caribbean. This scaled down cousin of its California counterpart opened on December 15, 1973.


Magic Kingdom



The entrance to Asia in Disney's Animal Kingdom is marked by a crumbling statue that once guarded this area.


Disney's Animal Kingdom



This final picture was taken on San Fransisco Street at Disney's Hollywood Studios.


Disney's Hollywood Studios



So there you have it. I hope you did well.



July 24, 2010

Tom Sawyer Island

I suspect that when most of you are planning your vacation to Walt Disney World, Tom Sawyer Island isn't high on your "must see" list. More likely, you're thinking about which resort to stay at, where to eat, character meet-and-greets, and possibly a ride on Space Mountain and Kilimanjaro Safaris. But you probably won't even think about Tom Sawyer Island until you're in Frontierland and you see one of the rafts transiting the Rivers of America. And that's okay; because Tom Sawyer Island doesn't require any advance planning. It only requires a willingness to experience a low-tech adventure that pays homage to a vanishing part of the American landscape.

Many people think that Tom Sawyer Island was an opening day attraction. But that's not the case. This section of Frontierland didn't open to the public until May 20, 1973. At that time it took a "D" coupon to ride the rafts to the island. Here are three pictures taken of the island, or should I say landfill, in January 1972. The first picture was taken in Frontierland, somewhat in front of Country Bear Jamboree, looking at the south tip of the island. Harper's Mill now sits on this spot.


Before Tom Sawyer Island


This next picture was taken from the Haunted Mansion. As you can see, there was nothing on the island except scrub brush.


Before Tom Sawyer Island


This last picture was taken from the Walt Disney World Railroad looking across what will someday be Thunder Mountain.

Before Tom Sawyer Island


Our journey begins in the far reaches of Frontierland. Here, on the banks of the Rivers of America is a landing where four rafts, the Tom Sawyer, Becky Thatcher, Injun Joe, and Huck Finn, are boarded for a short voyage across the water. Tom Sawyer Island is generally open from 10am until dusk.


Frontierland Landing

Raft on Rivers of America


If you're ever near the loading dock around 9:45, you might notice guests are already lining up to be aboard the first raft of the day. That's because they probably know something you don't. Each day, four to six paint brushes are hidden (in plain sight) in various places around the island. Those lucky enough to find one are rewarded with FastPasses to either Splash Mountain or Thunder Mountain when it's returned to a cast member. Note, the cast members change the hiding places daily so even if you've found a paint brush in the past, you'll have to search the next time you visit. Here are pictures of some lucky hunters.


Paint Brush

Paint Brush


Although there are several spots on the island where rafts can come ashore, generally, "Tom's Landing" is your point of entry. And just in case the long crossing put a strain on your bladder, restrooms are conveniently located here. Nearby is an amusing sign that sets the tone for your visit.


Tom's Landing

Welcum Sign


Also near Tom's Landing is a map of the island. If you take the time to read it, you'll find that every nook and cranny of the island has a name which can be traced back to Mark Twain's novel "Huckleberry Finn."


Map of Tom Sawyer Island


Although the entire island was planted by Disney horticulturists, it has a natural feel about it. You can truly forget you're in the middle of a bustling theme park and pretend you're somewhere along the Mississippi River. Here you'll find oaks, pine, sycamores, red maples and elms. Growing beneath their limbs are dwarf azaleas, firethorn and a dozen other species of bush. An occasional stream can also be encountered as you explore the various trails.

If we start out traveling counterclockwise from Tom's Landing the first point of interest we come to is Harper's Mill. The mill's namesake is Harper Goff, a longtime Imagineer who helped plan and design Disneyland and the Magic Kingdom. In addition, the mill's name can be traced back to Joe Harper who joins Tom and Huck when they ran away from home to Jacksons Island.

The grain mill is typical of those found along many of the rivers in the U.S. during the 19th century. It's interesting to note that the structure once sported a more weathered look than it does today. After years of operation, the mill required a major rehab and the water wheel needed to be replaced. The new wheel was constructed using modern bearings and spindles and when reattached, spun unrealistically fast. Imagineers needed to come up with a dampening system to slow the wheel down and make it appear as if it were built using period materials.


Harper's Mill

Harper's Mill


Harper's Mill also pays homage to one of Walt's early animation triumphs. In 1937, Walt Disney produced "The Old Mill," one of the Silly Symphonies. This was the first film to use the multiplane camera, a device that added depth of field to animation. This film also depicted realistic animal behavior, wind and rain effects, and new lighting techniques. So innovative was this film that it won the 1937 Academy Award for Best Short Subject, Cartoon.


Multiplane Camera


In one scene of the film, we see a bird that has made her nest inside a gear socket located within the old mill. As a storm outside starts to rage, the gears start to move, threatening to crush the mother and her eggs as the gears join together. But fate is with the bird and the opposing gear is missing one of its teeth, thus, the bird is never crushed.


The Old Mill

Bird and Gears


Inside Harper's Mill on Tom Sawyer Island is a complex set of gears used to grind grain. Within one of these gears you can see a small bird sitting on her nest. She too spins around as the waterwheel outside turns. But this bird is also spared a disastrous ending as the gears never quite crush her.


Bird and Gears


Now it's obvious that the old mill in the animated film looks nothing like Harper's Mill. And the gear configuration is not the same. But there can be no mistake that this is a tribute to one of Walt Disney's early masterpieces.

Around the bend from Harper's Mill we come to the spot where Tom Sawyer convinced his friends Ben Rogers, Johnny Miller, and Billy Fisher to do his chores and whitewash Aunt Polly's fence.


Whitwashed Fence


Nearby is Aunt Polly's cottage, surrounded by one of the most charming porches you'll ever hope to find. This is the perfect spot to sit and relax while the kids explore the rest of the island. This used to be my favorite spot in the Magic Kingdom to have lunch. A small selection of sandwiches, fried chicken, chips, and brownies used to be sold here. It was the ideal "picnic" meal that felt miles away from the hubbub of the other counter service restaurants. But due to budget cuts, the food selections were discontinued. All that is available here now are two vending machines that sell Coke products and bottled water. Sigh"


Aunt Polly's

Aunt Polly's

Aunt Polly's


Around the corner and up a hill from Aunt Polly's is a clearing in the forest. Benches and a picnic table are available for a pleasurable moment with nature. A little further along the trail is "Scavage Fort." This play spot of Tom's was built out of old doors, barrels, and odd pieces of wood. If you look closely you'll notice the roof is actually an old rowboat turned upside-down.


Clearing and Benches

Scavage Fort


Since Tom Sawyer Island is crisscrossed with trails, it's difficult to explore it logically. It's also difficult to describe it in a methodical order. Because of this, we're going to jump back to Tom's Landing (where we began) and start moving clockwise where we run into Old Scratch's Mystery Mine. Old Scratch (or Mr. Scratch) is a pre-civil war folk name for the devil.

This is a mine, not a cave. Timbers can be seen throughout holding up the precarious tunnels. Howling wind, water dripping, and bats' chirps can be heard as you make your way through this very dark passageway. About midway through you discover a beautiful collection of glowing gems. Note, this is a one-way tunnel that will deposit you on the other side of the island.


Old Scratch's Mystery Mine

Old Scratch's Mystery Mine

Old Scratch's Mystery Mine

Old Scratch's Mystery Mine


Not far from the entrance of Old Scratch's Mystery Mine is the opening to Injun Joe's Cave. If you remember, Tom witnessed Injun Joe murdering Doc Robinson and is later trapped in the cave with him. Inside the cavern you'll discover an eerie face and walk across an old bridge that spans a seemingly bottomless pit. Once again, this is a one-way passageway that exits on the other side of the island.


Injun Joe's Cave

Injun Joe's Cave


Both Injun Joe's Cave and Old Scratch's Mystery Mine are very dark and contain numerous twists and turns. It would be almost impossible for an adult to become disoriented but a small child could get turned around. And if your little one is afraid of the dark and creepy noises, you better skip these attractions. Also note, for those of you who would classify yourself as extra-large, some of the passageways will be tight for you.

When you exit the cave or mine, you'll be in the proximity of Poor Ole Jim's Shack and the Barrel Bridge. If you remember, Jim was a slave who flees from his master along with Huck, who is running away from his drunken father.


Poor Ole Jim's Shack


The Barrel Bridge is perhaps one of the most entertaining activities on the island. A dozen or so barrels have been lashed together and covered with planks of wood to create a floating bridge across Smuggler's Cove. Transiting this bridge is no easy task as each barrel bobs up and down as you put your weight on it. And it's just as much fun to watch others as it is to experience it for yourself.


Barrel Bridge

Barrel Bridge


Back near the entrance to Injun Joe's Cave is Potter's Mill. The mill is lovely to look at close up and from afar. You can also explore the inner workings of the mill via a stairwell that circles the driveshaft. The mill's namesake, Muff Potter, was a drunken fisherman and good friends with Tom and Huck. He was also framed for the murder of Doc Robinson by Injun Joe.


Potter's Mill

Potter's Mill


Near Potter's Mill is Huck's Landing. This dock is used during busier times when more than two rafts are transiting the river.


Huck's Landing


A unique feature of the Magic Kingdom's Tom Sawyer Island is that it is actually two islands. At Disneyland, it's only one. Connecting the two is a suspension bridge that bounces and sways as you journey across it. The more people, the more it bounces.


Suspension Bridge


Across the bridge and to the left is Pappy's Fishing Pier. This is a great place to sit for a spell and watch the trains careen around the curve on Big Thunder Mountain Railroad.


Pappy's Fishing Pier

Big Thunder Mountain


When Tom Sawyer Island first opened, the fort that anchors the north island was named Fort Sam Clemens (Mark Twain's real name). In later years, it was renamed Fort Langhorn - the middle name of Sam Clemens. It's interesting to note, his actual middle name is spelled with an "e" at the end - Langhorne.


Fort Langhorn

Fort Langhorn

Fort Langhorn

Fort Langhorn


The fort is a lot of fun to explore. There is a blacksmith's shop complete with some simple AudioAnimatronics figures, rifles that can be aimed at the passing riverboat (no bullets), and a simple checker board to be enjoyed.


Blacksmith

Rifle Roost

Checker Board


At one time, you could also purchase snacks and soft drinks at the fort, but this was discontinued years ago.

At the back of the fort is an escape tunnel. This leads to another dark cave that deposits guests along the riverbank and below the fort.


Escape Tunnel


That's pretty much the entire tour of Tom Sawyer Island. This attraction is low-tech all the way and if you're looking for a thrill a minute, then look someplace else. But if you're willing to invest about 30-40 minutes of your time, with realistic expectations, I think you'll find the island has a lot to offer.

Here is a video I shot of Tom Sawyer Island. Enjoy.




July 26, 2010

Quiz - Costumes and their Attractions - Questions

It's time for another quiz. This one is geared to those of you who frequent the Walt Disney World parks.

As you know, I'm always preaching that you should pay attention to the details. Well today's quiz deals with a "detail" that is in plain sight, the cast members' costumes. This is something that all of you have seen dozens of times but probably never noticed. Today I'm going to test just how well you really pay attention. All of the cast members depicted here work on an attraction at one of the four Walt Disney World parks (Magic Kingdom, Epcot, Disney's Hollywood Studios, and Disney's Animal Kingdom). An attraction can be a ride, show, or exhibit. None of these costumes represent merchandise or restaurant locations unless there is overlap. Your job, guess the attraction.

I do not know any of these wonderful cast members and my selection process was pretty simple. I arrived each day at 9am at one of the four theme parks. Then I made a mad dash to each attraction and asked the first cast member I saw if I could take their picture for a quiz I was preparing. I want to take this time to thank all of these helpful people who agreed to pose for me. You're great!

Once again, please don't send me your answers. There are no prizes to win or winners to be announced. This is strictly for your amusement.



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



Disney Costume



July 27, 2010

Quiz - Costumes and their Attractions - Answers

Here are the answers to yesterday's quiz. I hope you did well. Once again, please don't send me your answers. There are no prizes to win or winners to be announced. This is strictly for your amusement.



1. This picture was taken at the American Adventure in Epcot. However, this same costume can be seen at the Hall of Presidents attraction at the Magic Kingdom.


Disney Costume



2. This gentleman works at One Man's Dream at Disney's Hollywood Studios.


Disney Costume



3. This charming lady answers animal questions on the Pangani Forest Exploration Trail at Disney's Animal Kingdom.


Disney Costume



4. Need to cool off? See this gentleman for a ride on Splash Mountain at the Magic Kingdom.


Disney Costume



5. These hostesses can assist you at the Seas with Nemo and Friends at Epcot.


Disney Costume



6. This handsome pair introduce guests to their home country in the Canada Pavilion at Epcot.


Disney Costume



7. These ladies can be found at any of the attractions or games at Chester & Hester's Dinorama.


Disney Costume



8. If you didn't get this next one right, well, I don't know what to say. This somber soul works at the Haunted Mansion in the Magic Kingdom.


Disney Costume



9. In the mood for some thrills? This guy can direct you to the Lights, Motors, Action! Extreme Stunt Show at Disney's Hollywood Studios.


Disney Costume



10. Do you want the "Green" less intense experience or the "Orange" more intense experience on Mission: Space at Epcot?


Disney Costume



11. This guy can help you meet some trolls on Maelstrom in the Norway Pavilion at Epcot.


Disney Costume



12. This pair can direct you to your room at the Tower of Terror at Disney's Hollywood Studios.


Disney Costume



13. Need to get across town quick? This friendly guy can whisk you around Los Angeles by helping you board Rock 'N' Roller Coaster at Disney's Hollywood Studios.


Disney Costume



14. Who knew this smiling face could be capable of such swashbuckling adventures at Pirates of the Caribbean at the Magic Kingdom.


Disney Costume



15. Here we have a sherpa to help you through the Himalayan Mountains and Expedition Everest at Disney's Animal Kingdom.


Disney Costume



16. This gentleman can act as engineer on the Wildlife Express Train at Disney's Animal Kingdom.


Disney Costume



17. For a trip back to prehistoric times to see a Dinosaur, see this smiling gal at Disney's Animal Kingdom.


Disney Costume



18. This young man might usher you to your seat to see the Impressions de France film in the France Pavilion at Epcot.


Disney Costume



19. These explorers often skipper a boat on the Jungle Cruise at the Magic Kingdom.


Disney Costume



20. If a vacation to the moon of Endor sounds like the perfect getaway, see this smiling face for a Star Tours vacation at Disney's Hollywood Studios.


Disney Costume



21. If hanggliding is more to your liking, this gentleman can help you at the Soarin' attraction at Epcot in the Land Pavilion.


Disney Costume



22. Piloting a raft to Tom Sawyer Island is always fun at the Magic Kingdom.


Disney Costume



23. Do you have talent? Maybe this guy can help you discover your stage presence at The American Idol Experience at Disney's Hollywood Studios.


Disney Costume



24. Captain EO has returned to Epcot at the Imagination Pavilion and this young lady is ready to show you the King of Pop.


Disney Costume



25. Honey, I Shrunk the Kids Movie Set is where this gal will assist you with giant ants and towering blades of grass at Disney's Hollywood Studios.


Disney Costume



26. All of the cast members in Fantasyland at the Magic Kingdom sport this Alpine costume.


Disney Costume



27. This usherette can be found at the Great Movie Ride at Disney's Hollywood Studios.


Disney Costume



28. This gal is good friends with Kermit and Miss Piggy at Muppet*Vision 3D at Disney's Hollywood Studios.


Disney Costume



29. Bad guys watch out. Kim Possible is here to save the day at Epcot.


Disney Costume



30. Disney's newest theme park can be found in China. This lovely lady can be found in the China Pavilion in Epcot welcoming guests to the Reflections of China 360 movie.


Disney Costume



31. The Indiana Jones Epic Stunt Spectacular and the Beauty and the Beast Live on Stage show share this costume at Disney's Hollywood Studios. It's almost identical to the American Idol costume except cast members are allowed to wear short pants and here it's missing a distinctive American Idol patch.


Disney Costume



32. All of the attractions in Tomorrowland at the Magic Kingdom share this costume except for the Tomorrowland Speedway.


Disney Costume



33. At the Land Pavilion at Epcot, the Living with the Land attraction and the Circle of Life movie share this costume.


Disney Costume



34. At Disney's Hollywood Studios you'll find this costume at the Voyage of the Little Mermaid and Playhouse Disney shows.


Disney Costume



35. This charming hostess helps guests board the Gran Fiesta Tour Starring The Three Caballeros at the Mexico Pavilion in Epcot.


Disney Costume



36. Ellen's Energy Adventure at Epcot is where this smiling hostess can be found.


Disney Costume



37. The costume for Kilimanjaro Safaris at Disney's Animal Kingdom is almost identical to the costume worn on the Jungle Cruise at the Magic Kingdom. The difference lies in a Kilimanjaro Safaris patch on the sleeve and a large belt buckle.


Disney Costume



38. Go white-water rafting on Kali River Rapids at Disney's Animal Kingdom with this intrepid guide.


Disney Costume



39. Journey Into Imagination with Figment and this lab-coated technician at Epcot.


Disney Costume



40. Put a new car through its paces with this happy driver at Test Track at Epcot.


Disney Costume



41. Unless you want to wait in a long line, you better have a FastPass to ride Toy Story Midway Mania at Disney's Hollywood Studios.


Disney Costume



42. This smiling guy can help you on Swiss Family Treehouse, The Magic Carpets of Aladdin, and The Enchanted Tiki Room Under New Management at the Magic Kingdom.


Disney Costume



43. One of the most popular shows at Walt Disney World is Festival of the Lion King at Disney's Animal Kingdom and this camp counsilor can help you find a seat.


Disney Costume



44. All of the cast members at Innoventions East and West wear the same costume except for a patch that identifies their particular exhibit.


Disney Costume



45. Although this picture was taken at the Liberty Square Riverboat landing in the Magic Kingdom, the same costume is worn by those running the Walt Disney World Railroad. The only difference is their hat and tie. In the warmer, summer months, they're allowed to go without these accoutrements


Disney Costume



46. Take a journey back in time aboard Spaceship Earth at Epcot.


Disney Costume



47. This patriotic gentleman was seen in front of Hall of Presidents at the Magic Kingdom. But he could have just as easily been seen at the American Adventure in Epcot as they share the same costume.


Disney Costume



48. It's Tough to be a Bug at Disney's Animal Kingdom is where this cast member hangs out. If you take a closer look a the costume, you can see creepy-crawlers make up the design.


Disney Costume



49. Big Thunder Mountain Railway at the Magic Kingdom is where you'll find this smiling cast member.


Disney Costume



50. Here we have a trio of auto experts who help drivers big and small at the Tomorrowland Speedway in the Magic Kingdom.


Disney Costume



51. If you like tigers, this cast member will point them out to you on the Maharaja Jungle Trek at Disney's Animal Kingdom.


Disney Costume



Return to Blog Central

About July 2010

This page contains all entries posted to The “World” According to Jack in July 2010. They are listed from oldest to newest.

June 2010 is the previous archive.

August 2010 is the next archive.

Many more can be found on the main index page or by looking through the archives.